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[podcast] Lauder Eyes Infrared Skin Damage

Contact Author Rachel Grabenhofer with Tom Mammone, Ph.D., of The Estée Lauder Companies and Clinique Labs
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Tom Mammone, Ph.D.

Tom Mammone, Ph.D.

Returning to Cosmetics & Toiletries this month, Tom Mammone, Ph.D., of The Estée Lauder Companies and Clinique Labs, describes his research on the effects of infrared radiation in skin. The following excerpt was adapted from the podcast—click below to hear more.

C&T: What’s driving Lauder’s interest in infrared?

Mammone: The biggest driver is scientific interest. Over the years, we’ve worked with many experts who have educated us on UVA and UVB, and infrared (IR) was just the further end of the spectrum. Of the high energy wavelengths that come from the sun and reach the earth’s surface, IR is about 54-56%, so it’s a big component. As far as our skin, IR penetrates deeply; some say to the bone.

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C&T: How did you test the negative effects of IR?

Mammone: We grew artificial skin in the lab and irradiated it with different doses of IR. We found pretty significant changes in the skin barrier and activation along the inflammatory pathway.

C&T: Were findings what you expected?

Mammone: Yes, in terms of similar data to what the dermatology field was finding. What was exciting was when we went back to look for ways to remediate the damage. Antioxidants are a great initial line of defense but we found two new ways to protect against damage: energy enhancers and TRPV1 antagonists. 

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