Recent in Testing (page 9 of 21)

Quantifying the Performance of Hair Styling Products—Part 2

A previous article discussed traditional measurements to assess the properties of hair spray products. However, the properties of polymer films deposited by these products are not constant and can be altered by both formulation means and environmental conditions. This article highlights additional useful measurement techniques for characterizing these film properties.

Testing and Developing a Sugar-derived Surfactant Blend for Delicate Skin

Vegetable-derived, mild and sustainable skin cleansing ingredients are in demand, and this has led to the development of new detergent structures. Described here is a combination of two mild surfactants that fulfils these requirements using the concept of “interrupted soap” to impart mildness. Studies to verify the functional, sensorial and mild characteristics of the new blend are detailed.

Quantifying the Performance of Hair Styling Products—Part 1

There are two general classifications of hair styling products—those that help with style creation and those that prolong the style. Both facilitating style creation and promoting hold longevity stem from the presence of water-soluble polymers in formulations. This paper discusses methods to evaluate these properties and quantify performance.

From the Archives … Flexabrasion: A Method for Evaluating Hair Strength

From the December 2001 issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries, this article describes how both bending and abrasion should be tested–along with extension–when evaluating hair strength, as the authors show here in tests of an active developed to increase the strength of bleached hair.

Designing Mild Personal Care Products: A Case Study

This article reviews the mechanisms underlying skin irritation and sensitization, and methods used in a case study to test cosmetic products for their potential to cause irritation. It also covers the main skin conditions that can influence susceptibility to irritation, as well as ingredients affecting the mildness of cosmetic products.

Tape Stripping Method in Humans: Comparison of Evaporimetric Methods

The current preliminary study compared the sensitivity and correlation of open chamber device and closed chamber device on a tape stripping human model. The amount of SC removed by tape stripping was also quantified with a protein assay method.

Scalp Irritation From Hair Care Chemicals

While scalp irritation also can be caused by contact with physical or biological agents, this column will discuss the irritation resulting from hair chemicals. The desire for a specific hairstyle or color can render the scalp exposed to different hair chemicals that may result to scalp irritation.

Researchers Dig Deeper Into Relationship Between Bacteria and Atopic Dermatitis

Researchers from the Drexel University College of Medicine have established a clearer relationship between Staphylococci bacteria and the conditions atopic dermatitis (AD) and eczema.

Analyzing Deposition from Rinse-off Hair Products

The most common approach to determine ingredient deposition on hair is to analyze the treated tresses, but this poses several challenges. Instead, the authors describe a novel approach based on determining the amount of ingredient collected in the rinse water, and back-calculating the amount deposited on hair. Development and validation efforts discussed here use polydimethylsiloxane as a model compound.

Method to Reproduce In vitro Cosmetic Product Photostability Findings

The present article describes a reproducible method for determining the photostability of sunscreen products. This method is based in part on the in vitro determination of the UVA protection factor as proposed by Colipa for the irradiation aspect, and on the spectroscopy of a sunscreen in dilute solution for the absorbance measurement aspect.

The Effect of Glycerol on the Water-holding Capacity of Chemically Irritated Skin*

Glycerol is one humectant commonly employed due to its high hygroscopic and hyperosmotic properties. It is used in cosmetics as a moisturizer and in pharmaceutical formulations as an active compound. Being naturally present in the skin, glycerol was quickly identified for its role in skin hydration, similar to natural moisturizing factors (NMF).

Octocrylene Concerns Flag Industry's Attention

The industry reacts to a new study published in Contact Dermatitis reviews reports of the UV absorber octocrylene for its potential to cause photo contact allergy.

Can't find what you're looking for? Try searching, or looking through past issues.