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Recent in Methods & Processes (page 2 of 12)

K-beauty: Eastern Ritual vs. Western Pace, Adopting a Mindset

K-beauty appears to deliver its full benefits when embraced in its entirety, which due to time constrains, rarely happens in the West. This article reviews these important differences, as well as cultural views and biological implications.

Dermal-epidermal Separation, Part II: Enzymatic Digestion

Readers have expressed interest in understanding the most efficient and reliable methods to separate the epidermis and dermis as an important technique for basic skin investigation. This second installment in a three-part series reviews separation via enzyme digestion.

K-beauty A to Z: An Interview with Janice Kang

Many product categories were invented outside of Korea but Korean developers boosted their popularity, making them a “must-have” part of beauty routines. This interview with Janice Kang explores this and other facets of the K-beauty craze.

Editor's Note: Secret Sauce for Beauty

When panelists were asked what they wanted in a tomato sauce, no one ever said “extra chunky.” They had to discover they liked it. This is a critically important step in understanding consumer desires and tastes.

Is Beauty Really Being Disrupted?

Over the last decade the internet and social media have rewritten the transparency rules for brands and retailers, while also removing traditional barriers to entry for startup companies.

'Separation Anxiety' in Basic Skin Research: Dermal-epidermal Separation Methods, Part I: Chemical

The epidermal-dermal junction (EDJ) attaches the epidermis to the dermis and separates the skin's primary three layers: the dermis, epidermis and hypodermis. The EDJ is composed of four components, and it is important to preserve their structure and function as much as possible when separating the dermis from the epidermis.

Garbage to Glamour: Recycling Food by-products for Skin Care

Coffee, tomato, olive and citrus waste have a negative impact on the environment and economy. Recycling this waste could lower its impact and increase the sustainability of these ingredients. Waste from food processing is rich in healthy compounds that can be recycled into cosmetic formulations for various skin benefits.

Green Chemistry Evolves Around Lifecycle and Necessity

This guest advisor commentary is an excerpt taken from an interview with Prof. James Clark, Ph.D., of the York, UK-based Green Chemistry Centre for Excellence.

[podcast] Green Chemistry and Sustainability: A Discussion with James Clark, Ph.D.

In this interview, Prof. James Clark, Ph.D., of the University of York Green Chemistry Centre for Excellence, shares his insights on how green chemistry has changed and new opportunities for sustainability. Listen now!

Building Cosmetics to Boost Self-confidence: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Skin is the membrane of all membranes and can protect us physically, emotionally and even spiritually. In relation, cosmetics play a part in the discussion in society of self-esteem, and self-esteem is at the heart of success in modern societies.

Unexpected Paths to Sunscreens

Teleportation was once science fiction. Today's it's somewhat of a reality, if you consider how Facebook Live, Facetime, Skype, etc., transport our likenesses through time and space. I sense this indirect path may be the future to sunscreens.

Farnesene Forms a Flourishing Future

Applications in cosmetics and personal care as well as fragrances and flavors are driving an upward trend for the farnesene class of chemicals.

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