Sensory in Cosmetics Deciphered

Sep 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Luigi Rigano, PhD, Studio Rigano Industrial Consulting Laboratories
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Title: Sensory in Cosmetics Deciphered
sensoryx feelx sightx smellx
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The five senses are constantly at work to connect the human body with its environment by examining and controlling objects, people and circumstances. As a consequence, they induce logically or emotionally driven changes of behavior. People perform several types of sensory assessment every day, both consciously and subconsciously. The results of these evaluations determine their behavior, preferences, social life and purchasing.

One may ask how the perception involved in a sensory response can be translated by a test instrument, when this response involves the transmission of signals to the brain via the nervous system after physiological and behavioral contact. This is the task of sensory analysis, a scientific discipline created to measure, analyze and interpret the sensorial observations collected by sensory organ contact with objects, products or ingredients.

The sensory world is fueled by research conducted in different disciplines such as biology, neurobiology and sense chemistry. It extends to many industrial sectors where perception elements are crucial, including cosmetics. To express how important the schematic sensory path is in cosmetic formulations, and illustrate what its profile looks like, it is important to develop a strategy for sensory analysis that is easily described to young cosmetic formulators.1–3

Cosmetics are a formulation art whereby the formulator selects well-identified ingredients from a universe of possible substances and combines them in precise ratios to obtain a functional complex. In order to achieve successful cosmetic systems, four elements of formulation must be considered: safety, stability, efficacy and sensory, which are applied to the identification and assembly of ingredients. As always, cosmetic formulation strategy has many factors, and this column will establish the role that sensory plays during the cosmetic formulation process.

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Table 1. Oil phase ingredient characterization

Table 1. Oil phase ingredient characterization

Category  Required Characteristics Ingredients
 Night cream  Low diffusion and high emollient effect  Borage oil
 Anti-wrinkle cream  Medium to large application time  Almond oil
 Makeup  High spreading   Isostearyl isostearate
 Day cream   Medium diffusion and low oiliness  Octyl dodecanol
 Sun cream  Medium application time  Decyl oleate
 Face lotions  Medium absorption  C8–10 triglyceride
 Hand cream  Short to medium application time  Isopropyl myristate, isopropyl soyate
 Body lotions  Short to medium absorption  Dicaprilyl ether
 After bath  Fast absorption  C6 Laurate

 

 

Figure 1. Objective sensory assessment

Figure 1. Objective sensory assessment

Figure 2. Spreading value (SV) vs. molecular weight

Figure 2. Spreading value (SV) vs. molecular weight

Biography: Luigi Rigano, PhD, Studio Rigano Industrial Consulting Laboratories

Luigi Rigano, PhD, is a consultant for the cosmetics industry, co-director of the Institute of Skin and Product Evaluation (ISPE), and head of Studio Rigano Industrial Consulting Laboratories, a laboratory he founded in 1986. He spent more than 15 years in R&D, production and technical positions at Unilever, Intercos, Givaudan and Schering-Plough Corp., and is an active member of the International Federation of Societies of Cosmetic Chemists (IFSCC) and of the register of chemists in the Lombardia region of Italy. Rigano serves as a consultant at the Milan Court and has authored more than 80 scientific articles on cosmetics, aesthetics and dermatology.

a-b

a MT-100AQ (INCI: Titanium Dioxide (and) Hydrated Silica (and) Aluminum Hydroxide (and) Alginic Acid) is a product of Tayca Corp.

b Colorona SynColors (INCI: Synthetic Fluorphlogopite (and) Iron Oxides); Timiron SynWhite Satin (INCI: Synthetic Fluorophlogopite (and) Titanium Dioxide (and) Tin Oxide); and Timiron SynBeams (INCI: Varies) are products of Merck KGAa.

Formula 1. Silk cream

Formula 1. Silk cream

Formula 2. Mousse foundation

Formula 2. Mousse foundation

Formula 3. Cream-to-powder foundation

Formula 3. Cream-to-powder foundation

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