Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part IV, Absorption and Formulations

May 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Eliana B. Souto, PhD, and Johann W. Wiechers, PhD
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part IV, Absorption and Formulations
deliveryx nanostructured particlesx lipidsx absorptionx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: delivery | nanostructured particles | lipids | absorption

Abstract: In this fourth part of a five-part series discusses the percutaneous absorption of actives loaded into solid lipid SLNs and NLCs and their formulation in dermal cosmetics.

View citation for this article

EB Souto and JW Wiechers, Delivering actives via solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers: Part IV, percutaneous absorption and dermal cosmetic formulations, Cosm & Toil 127(5) 344-354 (May 2012)

Market Data

  • Peptides are spreading beyond their core facial care market; melanin-activating peptides (MAPs) are gaining momentum in self-tanning.
  • Self-tanning accounts for only 5% of the global sun care market.
  • Self-tanning is restricted to developed markets, with North America and Western Europe making up almost 80% of total sales.
view full article

Related Material

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Percutaneous absorption is strongly dependent upon the physicochemical properties of the active ingredient applied to skin—i.e., molecular weight (MW), liposolubility and octanol/water partition coefficient—and on the type and properties of the delivering vehicle. When this vehicle is based on lipid nanoparticulates, enhanced permeation has been reported.

SLNs and NLCs are typical nanoparticulate carriers composed of physiological and biodegradable lipids. These carriers were reviewed in Parts I, II and III of this series, with respect to chemical content, production techniques and physicochemical characterization. The present installment, Part IV, discusses the percutaneous absorption of actives loaded into SLNs and NLCs and their formulation in dermal cosmetics. This series will be expanded to include an additional Part V, which will focus on the rheological and texture analysis of lipid nanoparticles.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

Close

Table 1. Current cosmetic products on the market containing lipid nanoparticles

Table 1. Current cosmetic products on the market containing lipid nanoparticles

Currently, SLNs and NLCs are commercially available from several pharma cosmetic companies. Shown here are product names and main active ingredients, figuring in the colloidal system.

Figure 1. Protective effect of CoQ10-NLC on UVA-irradiated human embryo fibroblasts

Figure 1. Protective effect of CoQ10-NLC on UVA-irradiated human embryo fibroblasts

Protective effect of CoQ10-NLC on UVA-irradiated human embryo fibroblasts, compared with the control group; cell viability was assayed with MTT and expressed as percentage of control (n = 6); Modified after Reference 47.

Footnotes [Souto 127(5)]

aCarbopol 934 and bCarbopol 940 (both INCIs: Carboxyvinyl Polymer) are products of Lubrizol.

c Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream is a product of Dr. Rimpler GmbH, Wedemark, Germany.

Biography: Eliana B. Souto, PhD, University Fernando Pessoa

Eliana B. Souto, PhD

Eliana B. Souto, PhD, is an assistant professor at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University Fernando Pessoa in Porto, Portugal. She coordinates the Biopharmaceutical Chemistry Unit of the doctoral program in Biotechnology and Health, and the Euro-PhD in Advanced Drug Delivery from Galenos Network. Souto obtained her doctorate at the Institute of Pharmacy, Free University of Berlin, Germany. Her research group is devoted to the design, development and characterization of lipid nanocarriers for the controlled topical delivery of drugs and dermatocosmetics.

Biography: Johann W. Wiechers, PhD, JW Solutions

Johann W. Wiechers, PhD

A pharmacist by training, Johann W. Wiechers, PhD, earned his doctorate in 1989 in skin penetration enhancement at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. Following six years at Unilever in the UK, he joined Uniqema in 1995 as skin R&D director. Wiechers founded JW Solutions, a consultancy focused on various aspects of cosmetic science, and released "Formulating for Efficacy, the Software", a computer program to help you deliver your active ingredients more effectively. Johann is no longer with us, but the work he started will continue just as he would have wished.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In