Recent in In vitro (page 2 of 9)

Measuring the Antioxidant Potential of an Acai Extract

The antioxidant potential of cosmetic materials can be evaluated by several methodologies, including a commercial kit that measures total antioxidant status, as illustrated here with a commercial extract from the fruit of the açaí, a Brazilian palm tree. Applications in antiaging products are suggested.

Method to Reproduce In vitro Cosmetic Product Photostability Findings

The present article describes a reproducible method for determining the photostability of sunscreen products. This method is based in part on the in vitro determination of the UVA protection factor as proposed by Colipa for the irradiation aspect, and on the spectroscopy of a sunscreen in dilute solution for the absorbance measurement aspect.

Screening Botanical Ingredients: Challenges and Opportunities

Botanical ingredients are interesting for their unique and complementary chemical diversities yet they are criticized for these very traits, which make quality assurance, reproducibility and good phytochemical characterization—required for successful high throughput screening, difficult. This article discusses these challenges as well as the benefits of large-scale screenings of botanical extracts that are currently used or developed for cosmetic product development.

Detecting Estrogenic Endocrine Disruptors in Personal Care Products and Supplements

Endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs) are a class of chemicals that has raised alarm for being linked to a wide variety of detrimental effects on human and wildlife populations, e.g., cancers, precocious puberty and obesity. Thus, there is a need to test personal care products and supplements for EDCs, which can be accomplished using the validated bioassay described here.

Mature and Immature Corneocyte Detection Force Distance Curves vs. Microfluorometry

Here, the author compares two methods to determine the maturity of corneocytes based on their cross-linking that could be used to evaluate the anti-aging effects of molecular agents. The first utilizes microfluorometry, while the second involves F-D curves generated via contact mode AFM. Both methods successfully detected differences in mature or immature corneocytes with 95% confidence.

Testing Tactics—Consumer vs. Scientific Language: Relating In vivo to In vitro

It should perhaps go without saying that consumer products are sold using consumer language. Market researchers and consumer scientists spend a great deal of time studying their target audience and learning this vocabulary, which subsequently allows the recounting of product benefits in the same terminology.

IBN Engineers Hair Follicle Model for Development of Anti-hair loss Actives

The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has recently engineered a new hair follicle model that could help discover new drugs or active ingredients for hair regeneration.

Testing Tactics: REACH and In vitro Alternatives: Skin Irritation Testing

Welcome back to a continuing discussion regarding the new Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) regulation and its impact on chemical testing. It is the purpose of this series of articles to provide an overview of these existing validated in vitro methods, as well as new methods that are being considered for validation.

Rapid Colorimetric Analysis of para-Phenylenediamine in Henna-based, Non-permanent Tattoo Color Mixtures

In some henna mixtures, para-phenylenediamine (PPD) has illegally been added and it is responsible for complications such as allergic contact dermatitis. While high-performance liquid chromatography has previously been used to detect PPD, a colorimetric method that is faster and portable, described here, has been developed. For product developers, this method can be used to evaluate henna plant extracts.

In Sight—QOL Testing: Complementing Clinicals

Personal care efficacy tests are known to test the physical effects or toxicity of products, often omitting more abstract and possibly equally as important factors such as well-being.

Responsilbilities in Outsourcing Clinical Testing

It remains the responsibility of the manufacturer to substantiate the safety of both ingredients and finished cosmetic products prior to their being marketed.

‘How Did THAT Get in There?’ Identifying Particulate Contamination in Products and Packaging

Particulate contamination and discoloration may occur in products due to foreign materials introduced via raw materials or during the manufacturing process. Agglomeration or reactions between ingredients and packaging components also are possible sources. The identification of contaminants and their origin, described here, is therefore critical so that future incidents can be prevented and safety or regulatory concerns can be addressed.