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Recent in In vitro (page 2 of 6)

Collagens I and III, and Elastin Activation for Anti-aging

As an alternative to semi-invasive facial rejuvenation techniques, the authors developed an active ingredient to reactivate senescent fibroblasts by stimulating metabolic pathways for collagens I and III, and elastin. The biological activity of the resulting ingredient is investigated here using in vitro models, ex vivo explants and human volunteers.

Measuring the Water Content of Hair

Consumers have demonstrated a clear desire for hair that isn’t “dried out” while also demonstrating a clear distaste for the effects of high humidity on hair. To find the balance in creating products, it is necessary to have an accurate means of measuring hair’s water content. This article describes equipment used to perform this task while highlighting experimental variables that can produce suspect results and lead to incorrect conclusions.

Wise Words From the Bench With Sergio Nacht, PhD

Today, product formulation goes hand in hand with efficacy testing, but nearly 40 years ago, when Sergio Nacht, PhD, started out in the personal care industry, it was a different story. Throughout his decades in personal care, Nacht has developed methodologies that have allowed the personal care industry to establish efficacy of a product and convey this to the consumer. He has also been instrumental in the increased efficacy of personal care products through sustained release.

IBN Engineers Hair Follicle Model for Development of Anti-hair loss Actives

The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has recently engineered a new hair follicle model that could help discover new drugs or active ingredients for hair regeneration.

In Vitro Methods to Test Materials for Ozone Protective Capabilities

Many markers can be used to indicate epidermal stress. Therefore, it becomes clear that the skin is also a sensitive target to ozone exposure and one that could greatly benefit from cosmetic or personal care materials designed to protect against ozone.

Sensitive Skin Syndrome: Methodological Approaches

Manufacturers of topical products perform rigorous testing to assure their products are safe for consumers. Of particular interest is determining whether products will irritate the skin of the approximately 50% of consumers surveyed who consider themselves to have “sensitive” skin. The present article describes three such irritancy tests.

Measuring the Antioxidant Potential of an Acai Extract

The antioxidant potential of cosmetic materials can be evaluated by several methodologies, including a commercial kit that measures total antioxidant status, as illustrated here with a commercial extract from the fruit of the açaí, a Brazilian palm tree. Applications in antiaging products are suggested.

Screening Botanical Ingredients: Challenges and Opportunities

Botanical ingredients are interesting for their unique and complementary chemical diversities yet they are criticized for these very traits, which make quality assurance, reproducibility and good phytochemical characterization—required for successful high throughput screening, difficult. This article discusses these challenges as well as the benefits of large-scale screenings of botanical extracts that are currently used or developed for cosmetic product development.

Detecting Estrogenic Endocrine Disruptors in Personal Care Products and Supplements

Endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs) are a class of chemicals that has raised alarm for being linked to a wide variety of detrimental effects on human and wildlife populations, e.g., cancers, precocious puberty and obesity. Thus, there is a need to test personal care products and supplements for EDCs, which can be accomplished using the validated bioassay described here.

Mature and Immature Corneocyte Detection Force Distance Curves vs. Microfluorometry

Here, the author compares two methods to determine the maturity of corneocytes based on their cross-linking that could be used to evaluate the anti-aging effects of molecular agents. The first utilizes microfluorometry, while the second involves F-D curves generated via contact mode AFM. Both methods successfully detected differences in mature or immature corneocytes with 95% confidence.

Testing Tactics: REACH and In vitro Alternatives: Skin Irritation Testing

Welcome back to a continuing discussion regarding the new Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) regulation and its impact on chemical testing. It is the purpose of this series of articles to provide an overview of these existing validated in vitro methods, as well as new methods that are being considered for validation.

Testing Tactics—Consumer vs. Scientific Language: Relating In vivo to In vitro

It should perhaps go without saying that consumer products are sold using consumer language. Market researchers and consumer scientists spend a great deal of time studying their target audience and learning this vocabulary, which subsequently allows the recounting of product benefits in the same terminology.

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