Recent in Technology Transfer (page 4 of 6)

Electrifying Skin Delivery

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Just Click It: New Chemical Reactions for Cosmetic Applications

In the past decade, the chemistry community has seen the resurgence of several classical chemical reactions that once lay dormant in the depths of outdated organic chemistry textbooks. Well-established since the late 19th century, these reactions were largely ignored as synthetic chemists devoted their time to the development of new synthetic methodologies to keep up with the flourishing field of natural product synthesis. Recently, a resurgence in interest surrounding these classic reactions has led to amazing discoveries in chemical biology, polymer chemistry and materials science.

Seeing Through Natural Fragrances

Joining in the eco-responsible effort is The Robertet Group, a fragrance and flavor house that has created Seed to Scent (S2S), a program offering transparency to the consumer as to where and how its fragrance materials are produced.

Assessing Use of Gold Nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles have a wealth of pharmaceutical and medical uses. Notably, the ability of these nanoparticles to absorb light and turn this light into heat has put them at the center of ongoing cancer studies exploring their efficacy in destroying malignant cells.

Cellulosic Propylene Glycol Production

Walter Trahanovsky, PhD, a professor at Iowa State University's department of chemistry, and his team have developed a method to convert cellulose to glucose using pressure and high temperatures, but he was surprised to find the method also produced ethylene glycol and propylene glycol—two high value chemicals, one a major component in skin care products.

Assessing Use of Gold Nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles have a wealth of pharmaceutical and medical uses. Notably, the ability of these nanoparticles to absorb light and turn this light into heat has put them at the center of ongoing cancer studies exploring their efficacy in destroying malignant cells.

Signaling Skin pH with Indicator Dyes

Gerhard Mohr, PhD, head of the sensor materials group at The Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid State Technologies (EMFT), has developed dyes for wound dressings that change color when they detect infection. Interestingly, initial research for this wound-healing application originated in the water treatment field.

Sonically Infusing Eye Products

Many mothers have taught their daughters to apply creams, lotions and serums on the eye area using a light dabbing motion. Studying this motion, Robb Akridge, PhD, developed a device to sonically infuse eye products into the skin.

Literature Review—Terahertz Repair, Notch Signaling and Hydrangea

Following is a sampling of recent scientific literature as assembled by Rachel Grabenhofer, editor of Cosmetics & Toiletries, which was found to have potential impact on personal care.

Literature Review—Terahertz Repair, Notch Signaling and Hydrangea

Following is a sampling of recent scientific literature as assembled by Rachel Grabenhofer, editor of Cosmetics & Toiletries, which was found to have potential impact on personal care.

In Sight—Diet for Better Skin Health

Paula Simpson, executive director of Isocell North America, firmly believes in “feeding the skin from within.” As a nutritionist, Simpson has made a career of advising consumers to follow a healthy diet and supplement it with nutraceuticals; more recently, she became involved where nutraceuticals and cosmetics meet—in nutricosmetics.

Spin-coated Layers for Nano Film Strength

Daeyeon Lee, PhD, and Jacob Prosser, along with fellow researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, were investigating the manipulation of nanoparticle films through spin-coating conditions when they discovered a method to prevent cracks in films for solar cell coatings, and possibly for cosmetics.

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