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Naturals: The New Cosmetic Religion

There is a connection between religion and cosmetics, and that connection is naturals. Naturals are the new (cosmetic) religion. This column's provocative title tries to link the evidence for the existence of God to the evidence for the claimed benefits of naturals.

FTC Calls for Comments on its Revised 'Green' Product Claims Guidance

The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is seeking public comments on proposed revisions for its "Green Guides," which are designed to help marketers avoid making misleading product claims. Since marketing often impacts product formulation, it is important for formulators to understand the proposed changes as well as provide their input.

TRI/Princeton Forms Group to Advance Measurement Techniques

TRI/Princeton announced it has formed a Measurement Service and Claims Support group to expand its personal care product performance and claims support test methods with new measurement techniques.

FDA Adds Cosmetic Manufacturers to Import Alert for Drug Claims

The US Food & Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) has re-issued an import alert that scrutinizes cosmetic manufacturers importing antiaging products into the United States that make drug claims.

Comparatively Speaking: Cosmetic Labeling in the United States

In this excerpt, Tony O'Lenick looks to Perry Romanowski to explain how to list ingredients on a cosmetic product label in the United States, for the benefit of novice formulators.

Is Cosmetic Science Really "Bad"? Part V: Who do you think you are fooling?

In previous installments of this series, the author applied Michael Shermer's Baloney Detection Kit, which includes ten questions to ask to validate a science, to cosmetic science. Having previously applied the first eight questions, the author addresses the final two in this installment.

FDA Cracks Down on Medicinal Claims Regarding Bee By-products

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cracked down on Wisconsin-based Beehive Botanicals Inc. after the company did not comply with requests to remove and change misbranded and unapproved claims from its Web site and labels.

Certifying Hair Product Claims

Claims for hair products generally are not associated with clear cut outcomes. Therefore, consumers have no standard by which to compare product efficacy. In relation, the North American Hair Research Society (NAHRS) has proposed standards for hair product claims, outlined here, which relate to characteristics including frizz, color fastness and curl retention, among others.

Translating Data into Claims and Interpreting Regulations: Science vs. Marketing

Substantial evidence, which the FDA requires to support claims for drugs, is applicable to personal care, especially considering the pharmaceutical direction products have taken. The present article considers whether the industry is benefiting from marketing without assuming the responsibility for potential effects. In addition, it considers the limitations of in vitro and in vivo test models.

Is Cosmetics Science Really "Bad"? Part III: Evidence to Support Claims in the Real World

This is the third column of a series that applies Michael Shermer's "Baloney Detection Kit" to cosmetic science. This column tackles the fourth, fifth and sixth of ten core questions included in the "kit": those relating to claims substantiation.

Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Israel Manufacturers Association Creates Label for Dead Sea Products

The Israel Manufacturers Association has developed a quality label for skin care products that are formulated with ingredients from the Dead Sea.