Troubleshooting Microemulsion Systems

Oct 1, 2011 | Contact Author | By: Peter Tsolis, The Estee Lauder Companies; and Christopher Heisig, PhD, Steris Corp.
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Title: Troubleshooting Microemulsion Systems
microemulsionsx surfactantsx deliveryx
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Keywords: microemulsions | surfactants | delivery

Abstract: Microemulsions have long assisted the pharmaceutical industry in delivering efficacious levels of an active ingredient to the skin by enhancing the active’s bioavailability, versus traditional solutions and dispersions.

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P Tsolis and C Heisig, Troubleshooting Microemulsion Systems, Cosm & Toil 126(10) 608 (2011)

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Various emulsion types have been developed throughout the history of the cosmetic industry. Due to their ability to solubilize relatively large amounts of water-insoluble ingredients, i.e., emollients and fragrances, and provide long-term stability, microemulsions have been a suitable vehicle in various skin care applications. Microemulsions have long assisted the pharmaceutical industry in delivering efficacious levels of an active ingredient to the skin by enhancing the active’s bioavailability, versus traditional solutions and dispersions.1 An example of this technology is seen in the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporina, commonly used to treat psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

These novel vehicles soon made their transition for many skin care applications, where they provide luxurious aesthetics as well as outstanding stability. The benefit of these microemulsions has been identified for various skin care applications such as moisturization, cleansing, sunscreen and antiperspirants. Their advantage over conventional formulations to introduce lipophilic and hydrophilic actives to the skin or hair has proved to be beneficial.

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Biography: Peter Tsolis, The Estée Lauder Companies

Peter Tsolis

Peter Tsolis has held various positions within The Estée Lauder Companies R&D for the past 14 years, ranging from innovation to business and brand development. He is an active member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and has presented on skin care formulation, delivery systems and new technology. His research interests include innovative technology, optimizing formulas and marketing.

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