Benefits of Borneo Camphor-derived Hydrotropes for 'Natural' Formulations

Dec 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Gloria Pagnutti; Marco Riva, MD; and Luigi Rigano, PhD, Rigano Industrial Consulting and Research; and Robert Gick, CABB GmbH
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Title: Benefits of Borneo Camphor-derived Hydrotropes for 'Natural' Formulations
hydrotropex solubilityx dispersionx co-emulsificationx pigmentsx fixative polymersx
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Keywords: hydrotrope | solubility | dispersion | co-emulsification | pigments | fixative polymers

Abstract: Alpha-pinene, typically derived from pine trees, is also a by-product of the paper manufacturing process. The material is a source of low-toxic and naturally based isobornyl ethers, from which a new hydrotrope, dipropylene glycol isobornyl ether, was developed.The present study examines the unique dispersion and solubility properties of this material, among other benefits, and its application in cosmetics.

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G Pagnutti, M Riva and L Rigano, Benefits of Borneo camphor-derived hydrotropes for 'natural' formulations, 125(12) 40-48 (Dec 2010)

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Green chemistry in cosmetics is an ever-expanding area that has generated interest in the investigation of vegetal ingredients, environmentally friendly processes and by-products derived from other industrial applications, among others. For example, alpha-pinene is typically derived from pine trees but is also a by-product of the paper manufacturing process. Alpha-pinene is a source of low-toxic and naturally based non-ionic molecules such as isobornyl ethers.

From such isobornyl ethers, dipropylene glycol isobornyl ether was developed, a liquid hydrotrope characterized by an unusual lipid chain. The present study examines the properties of this material and its potential application in the cosmetic field. Materials such as these are of interest because they combine forthcoming chemical and physical properties with sustainability and other ecological aspects, thus paving the way to new product formulations.


Lab Practical: Usign DGIE

  • DGIE is a transparent, slightly yellow liquid with characteristic odor and good stability.
  • This material exhibits solubilizing and co-emulsifying properties, although it is not classified as a surfactant.
  • DGIE is a hydrotrope and decreases the surface tension in water phase nearly proportionally at very low concentrations.
  • As an oil phase, the material shows an apparent required HLB of 11.5 in the o/w region and a required HLB of 6.7 in the w/o region.
  • Tests have verified its low toxicity (LD50 > 2000 mg/kg).
  • The material is soluble with glycols, alcohols, oils and waxes.
  • DGIE successfully disperses pigments.

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Figure 1. Dipropylene glycol isobornyl ether (DGIE)

Figure 1. Dipropylene glycol isobornyl ether (DGIE)

A new liquid hydrotrope, dipropylene glycol isobornyl ether, has been developed that is characterized by an unusual lipid chain.

Figure 2. Beeswax, microcrystalline wax, ozokerite and rice bran wax

Figure 2. Beeswax, microcrystalline wax, ozokerite and rice bran wax

Beeswax, microcrystalline wax, ozokerite and rice bran wax in their usual state (solids) and when swollen at 20% in DGIE

Figure 3. Opalescent bath oil

Figure 3. Opalescent bath oil

Figure 3. Opalescent bath oil a) without DGIE (opaque), b) with 10% (opalescent) and c) with 15% DGIE (transparent)

Footnotes [Rigano 125(12)]

a Pribelance Clear (INCI: Dipropylene Glycol Isobornyl Ether) is a product of CABB GmbH, Sulzbach, Germany.

Formula 1. Opalescent bath oil

PEG-7 glyceryl cocoate 20.0% w/w
Sodium laureth sulfate (and) water (aqua) 20.0
Sorbeth-40 hexaoleate 10.0
Hydrogenated polydecene 49.0
Caprylyl glycol (and) phenoxyethanol 1.0
Note: DGIE at 10% or 15% was used to replace the hydrogenated polydecene.

 

 

Formula 2. Antiperspirant o/w spray

Water (aqua) qs to 100.00%
Glyceryl stearate (and) ceteareth-20 (and) ceteareth-12 (and) cetearyl alcohol-12 (and) cetyl palmitate 4.50
Ceteareth-20 1.00
Coco-caprylate/caprate 5.00
Dicapylyl ether (or) DGIE 5.00
Triclosan 0.25
Aluminium chlorohydrate 15.00
Fragrance (parfum) qs

 

 

Formula 3. Hair styling spray

Water (aqua) qs to 100.00% w/w
Panthenol 0.20
Inositol 0.05
VP/VA copolymer 2.00
Vinylcaprolactam/VP/dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate crosspolymer 1.00
Alcohol denat. 57.00
Isopropyl alcohol (or) DGIE (Pribelance Clear, CABB GmbH) 2.00, 5.00, 10.00
Hydrolyzed vegetable protein (and) water (aqua) 0.10
Fragrance (parfum) 0.40
Note: This preparation was prepared with isopropyl alcohol or DGIE.

  

 

Formula 4. W/O test emulsion

Water (aqua) qs to 100.00% w/w
Glycerin 1.0
Magnesium sulfate 0.7
Helianthus annuus seed oil 3.0
Caprylic capric triglyceride 10.0
Hydrogenated polydecene 10.0
Dimethicone 1000 1.0
Polyglyceryl-4-diisostearate/polyhydroxy-stearate/sebacate 1.5
Preservatives qs
Note: This preparation was prepared with and without 3% and 5% DGIE, added to the oil phase.

 

 

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