Recent in Function (page 38 of 40)

Vegetal-derived Emulsifiers for Improved Stability and Formula Efficiency

The quest for PEG-free surfactants and emulsifiers has led to new classes of vegetal-derived, ethylene oxide-free ingredients for environmentally friendly personal care products. Two such ingredients, described here, are based on the combination of olive oil and vegetable proteins with the first derived from oat and the second, with glutamic acid. These materials provide mildness and skin protection benefits.

Improving Tactile Properties of Vegetable Oils with Vegetable Oil-based Esters

Vegetable oil-based esters are shown by the authors to improve the tactile attributes of vegetable oil by lowering its viscosity and improving its spreadability, in addition to providing environmentally friendly options for cosmetic chemists.

Hand Sanitizer Actives: A Review

Hand sanitizing is a proven public health benefit that has grown globally. While alcohol is the most tested and proven active used for hand sanitizing, other actives are employed, including quats, triclosan and natural antimicrobials. Here, the authors review the benefits and limitations of various hand sanitizer actives.

Feasibility Study of Sago Starch for Perfumed and Cooling Body Powders

In the present article, sago starch-containing perfumed and cooling body powders are formulated and their physicochemical properties for potential skin irritation are examined. The results indicate that sago starch could potentially be used as the main component in body powders.

A Micro-wax Dispersion to Condition Hair and Reduce Breakage

Here, a micro-wax dispersion is shown to provide conditioning and anti-hair breakage properties. The authors incorporated the material into test shampoos, compared them with two silicone-based benchmarks, and found the micro-wax shampoos provided comparable conditioning and improved hair breakage prevention performance. Results were confirmed in a hair washing test.

Understanding Fragrance in Personal Care

Fragrances often are used in personal care products to affect the consumer’s perception of product performance. Therefore, product formulators must be cognizant of their target audience, as well as aware of fragrance allergens, approved fragrance materials and interactions between fragrances and other ingredients. The present article provides an overview of these factors.

Cooking Chemistry and the Formulator—Seasonings: Taste and Smell

This article is the last in a four-part series that highlights connections between cooking chemistry and personal care product development, including reactions that occur and why, and how to best utilize these reactions, for the benefit of formulators.

Fragrance and Raw Materials: Birds of a Feather

There is more to fragrance formulation than meets the eye—or nose that is. Both raw material and fragrance formulators spend significant time in the lab testing different materials to determine which ingredients, oils, extracts, etc. best meet their formulation and consumer’s needs. And although fragrance and personal care are two different industries, the discovery processes prove similar.

A Direct Connection to Melanocytes

An academic study of the pathway of UV-induced pigmentation may have created a safe tan for sunseekers. Scientists at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, have begun research and evaluation of the compound forskolin, which they believe darkens skin pigmentation successfully without the use of self-tanners and without sun exposure.

Chitin Nanofibrils for Improved Photoprotection

Chitin nanofibrils (CN) are capable of interacting with cosmetic actives by binding to the stratum corneum, thus influencing their thermodynamic activity. Here, the authors test various sunscreen samples and determine that the addition of CN provides an interesting boost to the photoprotective activity of sunscreens.

Cellulite: Evolving Technologies to Fight the 'Orange Peel' Battle

This article focuses on the structure of cellulite and examines materials that claim to affect its appearance via mechanisms such as lipolysis, lipogenesis, water drainage, tissue repair and the firming of skin.

Pisum Sativum Extract for Safe- and Self-Tanning

The cosmetic industry is challenged to develop active ingredients to provide the skin with a natural, healthy glow without sunlight exposure. Here, the author examines the effects of Pisum sativum extract on melanocytes and shows a time- and dose-dependent increase in skin tone, also suggesting the material could protect skin from UV damage.

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