In Effect

Mar 28, 2008 | Contact Author | By: Rachel Chapman, Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine
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Title: In Effect
  • Article

Language evolves to reflect current times and real-world styles of communication. Today’s social tongue is more abrupt than the flowery, ornate days of thou and thee, hither and yon; the quickened pace of life has chopped it all down to acronyms and abbreviations that are easily e-mailed, IM’d (instant messaged) or blogged.

Not to get hung up on semantics—actually, it does get hung up on semantics—the term cosmeceutical became industry lingo some time ago, and while the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not recognize the term, the industry does in one way or another. The consumer does, too, as is evidenced by a growing US $5.4 billion market.*

Looking ignorantly at the term itself, it obviously combines cosmetics with pharmaceuticals. What entity does this create? Either a cosmetic with pharmaceutical efficacy, or vice versa. In this industry, claims are the key and must be cosmetic for the sake of the FDA; yet, for the sake of the consumer, effects must approach pharmaceutical. How can the industry balance these opposing forces?

The recent Cosmeceuticals Summit held in San Diego explored this topic, highlighting innovations such as: treatment and imaging devices, novel additives from the plastics industry, biopolymers, amino acid derivatives, biosurfactants, delivery systems, DNA repair agents, extremophiles, antioxidants; and more (see Page 10). After considering cutting-edge innovations, the summit turned its focus to the regulatory considerations of such inventions.

This issue of C&T magazine delves even deeper into cosmeceutical solutions to help formulators meet the consumer demand for efficacy. Bilodeau and Lacasse look to the sea to incorporate the survival skills of algae into a skin care strategy. Farwick et al. describe a skin lipid concentrate that mimics real human skin to enhance barrier function, moisturization and elasticity. And in the Bertin et. al feature, the authors propose a dimethylaminoethanol, retinol and mineral salt combination to combat the appearance of wrinkles.

FYI—This issue of C&T magazine looks hither and yon, from skin itself to shining sea, to deliver effective new cosmeceutical formulating solutions. Feel free to e-mail or IM your feedback to us.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article that appeared in the April 2008 issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine. If you would like a copy of the complete article, please contact us at customerservice@cosmeticsandtoiletries.com.