Testing Tactics—Consumer vs. Scientific Language: Relating In vivo to In vitro

May 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Trefor Evans, PhD, TA Evans LLC
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Title: Testing Tactics—Consumer vs. Scientific Language: Relating In vivo to In vitro
in vivox in vitrox hair carex consumer lanuguagex sensorialx
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Keywords: in vivo | in vitro | hair care | consumer lanuguage | sensorial

Abstract: It should perhaps go without saying that consumer products are sold using consumer language. Market researchers and consumer scientists spend a great deal of time studying their target audience and learning this vocabulary, which subsequently allows the recounting of product benefits in the same terminology.

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T Evans, Testing tactics—Consumer vs. scientific language: Relating in vivo to in vitro, Cosm & Toil 128(5) 300-304 (May 2013)

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  • Striking K-pop hair styling and makeup trends are storming Indonesia's youth.
  • After the demand for hair coloring products, straightening and perming products are second in demand, with sizeable marketshare.
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Editor’s note: Cosmetics & Toiletries is pleased to revive its former “Testing Tactics” column with two new columnists. Chris McLeod will focus on skin beginning in June 2013, and Trefor Evans, PhD, featured here, focuses on hair. Evans’ expertise in designing tests and interpreting results will advance the scientific understanding of hair and strengthen claims substantiation. Readers are invited to engage in this article on the Cosmetics & Toiletries' LinkedIn Group, or send comments to CTEdit@allured.com.

It should perhaps go without saying that consumer products are sold using consumer language. Market researchers and consumer scientists spend a great deal of time studying their target audience and learning this vocabulary, which subsequently allows the recounting of product benefits in the same terminology. In the hair care world, this has resulted in a long list of now well-known attributes that represent the language of the industry. Thus, R&D may receive direction from marketing colleagues to develop products that better promote “shine,” increase “strength,” tame “frizz,” or aid in any number of other familiar properties.

Upon receiving these directives involving consumer-derived words and phrases, there is a natural tendency for the product development chemist to consider the attributes from a highly scientific standpoint. Therefore, the term strength may be equated with the tensile properties of individual fibers, frizz could be associated with electrostatic buildup during grooming, and shine may be taken to relate to the interaction of light with the hair surface. As such, armed with their mission and these notions, the product developers embarks on a variety of strategies in an attempt to attain their objective.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Figure 1. Instrumental assessment of combing forces

Combing force device

An instrumental combing experiment can be used to demonstrate how surface lubrication delivered from conditioning products is able to dramatically lower frictional forces and subsequently facilitate the grooming process.

Figure 2. Adsorption isotherms

Adsorption isotherms

Adsorption isotherms show the relationship between the moisture content of hair and the relative humidity.

Biography: Trefor Evans, PhD

Trefor Evans, PhD

Contributing author Trefor Evans, PhD, has worked in the hair care industry for more 20 years, with the majority of his time spent as a manager in the product development labs of Helene Curtis and Unilever. He also served for fi ve years as director of measurement services at TRIPrinceton before establishing his own consultancy, TA Evans LLC.

Evans holds a doctorate in physical-analytical chemistry and specializes in measurement science. He holds seven patents related to hair care, and has published numerous articles in trade magazines and scientific literature. His work has been awarded twice by the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, and he is a co-author and co-editor of the book Practical Modern Hair Science, published by Allured Business Media.

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