Influence of Skin Diffuse Reflectance on Sun Damage and Ingredient Efficacy Measurements

Mar 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Olga V. Dueva-Koganov, PhD, Artyom Duev and Steven Micceri, AkzoNobel Surface Chemistry
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Title: Influence of Skin Diffuse Reflectance on Sun Damage and Ingredient Efficacy Measurements
skinx diffuse reflectancex in vitro methodsx
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Keywords: skin | diffuse reflectance | in vitro methods

Abstract: Current in vitro methods to assess photostability and antioxidant activity do not account for the diffuse reflectance of skin. Described here is an in vitro test that addresses this variable, mimics end-use product conditions and models photodamage processes. The approach is employed to determine the efficacy of an antioxidant from the Camellia sinensis (tea) plant.

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OV Dueva-Koganov, A Duev and S Micceri, Influence of skin diffuse reflectance on sun damage and ingredient efficacy measurements, Cosm & Toil 128(3) 182-191 (Mar 2013)

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Existing in vitro methods for the determination of photostability and the antioxidant activities of topical ingredients do not account for diffuse reflectance (DR), which varies with different skin types and impacts measurement parameters. A higher DR increases the probability of more photons being reflected and reacting with topically applied actives on a substrate or skin. This can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further contributes to photo-instability and oxidative damage.

To address this DR variable, a novel in vitro test method was developed to mimic end-use product conditions and model photodamage processes in different skin types. This approach is used here to examine the efficacy and photostability of a finished sunscreen formulation and to determine the efficacy of a cosmetic ingredient, Camellia sinensis (tea) planta, in protecting against sun-induced ROS in model systems.

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This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.

 

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Table 1. Comparison of DR ratios

Table 1. Comparison of DR ratios

The DR spectra in the UVAI-VIS region (360–740 nm) of the artificial collagen-based substrate placed on the skin tone color chart background were measured and compared with the DR spectra of various color types of human skin measured in vivo, as well as with the relevant data reported in the literature.

Table 2. Activities of living Camellia sinensis ingredient against sunlight-induced ROS

Table 2. Activities of living <em>Camellia sinensis</em> ingredient against sunlight-induced ROS

The serum fraction had high efficacy against sunlight-induced ROS, singlet oxygen and peroxy products of oxidative damage.

Figure 1. Skin tone color chart backgrounds

Figure 1. Skin tone color chart backgrounds

Skin tone color chart backgrounds, starting with the bottom band: black, dark brown, light brown, yellow-beige, dark beige, light beige, white

Figure 2. A comparison of DR spectra

Figure 2. A comparison of DR spectra

A comparison of DR spectra; solid lines are profiles of panelist skin and dashed lines are profiles of artificial test substrate placed on color chart backgrounds.

Figure 3. Impact of DR on sunlight-generated ROS

Figure 3. Impact of DR on sunlight-generated ROS

Systems with both probes and vehicle control were tested on different backgrounds.

Figure 4. Sunlight interactions with human skin

Figure 4. Sunlight interactions with human skin

Upon interaction with skin, sunlight can be reflected, scattered or absorbed.

Footnotes [Dueva-Koganov 128(3)]

a Recentia CS serum fraction (INCI: Camellia sinensis (tea) plant) (CAS #1196791-49-7) is a product of AkzoNobel Surface Chemistry LLC, produced via the company’s Zeta Fraction process.
b Color Chart 25 C from the Leneta Company was used for this study.
c Vitro Skin (N-19) is a product of IMS Inc.
d The CM 2600d Spectrophotometer used is a product of Konica Minolta.
e The PMA2100 Radiometer and PMA2101 Detector used for this study are manufactured by the SolarLight Company.
f The 96-well microtiter plates used for this study are manufactured by Corning 3651.
g The solar light (1.5 AM) 16S-300-002 with XPS400 precision power supply used for this study is manufactured by the SolarLight Company.
h The Synergy 2 microplate reader used for this study is manufactured by BioTek.

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