Recent in Technology Transfer (page 7 of 10)

Kline Anticipates Growth for At-home Skin Devices

A report by Kline & Company estimates that at-home skin care devices garnered nearly US $1 billion in 2011 and anticipates that figure to grow in 2012. At-home Skin Care Devices 2011, finds the personal care market ripe for acne elimination, anti-aging and daily cleansing devices.

Nanostructured Device Created to Identify Liquids

Researchers at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a device that can identify an unknown liquid.

Researchers Discover Antioxidant Benefits in Black Poplar Extract

Researchers at Biolandes and Polyphénols Biotech have found antioxidant content in a poplar bud (Populus nigra). In "Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Poplar Bud (Populus nigra) Extract: Individual Antioxidant Contribution of Phenolics and Transcriptional Effect on Skin Aging," an article that appeared in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the researchers suggest that an aqueous extract of P. nigra possesses antioxidant properties that could be utilized in nutraceuticals for an anti-aging skin benefit.

Researchers Find Pain Relief in Poisonous Shrub

Researchers in Africa have discovered pain relief benefits in a poisonous shrub.

Researchers Find More Polyphenols in Cacao Seeds Than Fruit Juice

Researchers from the Hershey Center for Health & Nutrition have published a paper suggesting that cacao seeds contain a high amount of antioxidants and more polyphenols and flavanols than fruit juice.

Seeing Through Natural Fragrances

Joining in the eco-responsible effort is The Robertet Group, a fragrance and flavor house that has created Seed to Scent (S2S), a program offering transparency to the consumer as to where and how its fragrance materials are produced.

Scientists Find Non-stick Benefit in Starfish

Scientists have found a non-stick benefit in the slimy material that covers the body of Marthasterias glacialis, a species of spiny starfish.

Signaling Skin pH with Indicator Dyes

Gerhard Mohr, PhD, head of the sensor materials group at The Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid State Technologies (EMFT), has developed dyes for wound dressings that change color when they detect infection. Interestingly, initial research for this wound-healing application originated in the water treatment field.

Researchers Develop Color-changing Sensor for Fluoride

Researchers at Florida State University has developed a molecular sensor based on naphthalene diimide that changes color when it comes into contact with fluoride.

Winds of Change

In many companies, thinking outside of the proverbial box is encouraged year-round; but in the last few months, innovation has notably been emphasized in event themes and even government agency efforts.

Better Bonds from Mollusk Chemistry

Most consumer attention to oysters and mussels has centered on their taste, beautiful by-products or aphrodisiac effects; however, their adhesive properties are what caught the attention of Jonathan Wilker. These properties could be adapted for personal care.

NY Chemists Develop Nature-inspired Responsive Molecule

An amphiphilic molecule designed by chemists at The City College of New York is said to respond to stimuli in a similar manner to the Venus fly trap by changing its structure when heated slightly, then reverting to its original form when cooled.

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