Recent in Technology Transfer (page 2 of 6)

New Advances for Transdermal Delivery at C&T Summit

New technologies have been designed to carry drugs and natural molecules in a targeted manner across the skin into the dermis, and Joseph Gabriele, PhD, of McMaster University and Delivra Inc., has been at the forefront of this research. He will present his work at the Cosmetics & Toiletries Summit.

Nanocrystal Liquid Identification

Watermark Ink (W-Ink) utilizes chemical and optical properties of nanostructured materials to distinguish liquids based on surface tension. The nanostructured material is called an inverse opal, which is a layered glass structure with an internal network of ordered, interconnected air pores.

Recent Advances in Biopolymers and Biomedical Materials

This overview of recent literature provides a snapshot of research trends in biopolymers and biomedical polymers. To improve product efficacy, the personal care industry often looks to other sectors for innovative materials and ideas. Here, the authors encourage readers to innovate by technology transfer and by gaining a better understanding of biopolymers.

Cosmogizmoceuticals: The Physics and Chemistry of Looking Better

This article presents skin optics and strategies to design cosmetics that more closely match normal human skin. Topics covered include the spectral reflectance of hemoglobin chromophores, spatial variations and color texture, and optical scattering and translucence. In addition, interference coatings are considered, as are examples of the interplay between home-use devices and agents that affect aging skin.

Wild Plum, Nano Self-assembly Delivery, Rice Leaf Self-cleansing and More

Following is a sampling of recent scientific literature as assembled by Rachel Grabenhofer, editor of Cosmetics & Toiletries, which was found to have potential impact on personal care.

Wild Plum, Nano Self-assembly Delivery, Rice Leaf Self-cleansing and More

Following is a sampling of recent scientific literature as assembled by Rachel Grabenhofer, editor of Cosmetics & Toiletries, which was found to have potential impact on personal care.

In Sight: Color Cosmetics On the Move

The Hewlett-Packard Company (HP), known for its computer, printer and digital imaging technology, is using what it knows about pigments and applying it to color cosmetics, specifically foundation.

In Sight: Formulating For Fido

Formulating for pet care is not that different from formulating personal care. Although it may seem that formulating for pet care would be simpler than personal care, the truth may astonish some.

In Sight: Packaging Becomes Eco-friendly

The personal care industry is well on its way to more eco-friendly packaging. Emerging chemicals on the scene only assure the industry that as technology advances, the time it takes for a product to biodegrade will only shorten.

Special Delivery: Clay Nanotubes for Skin

By 2011, clay nanocomposites are projected to reach 44% of the marketshare—and it is this area that provides opportunities in personal care, as recent research by one manufacturer of naturally occurring nanotubes and other nanomaterials, NaturalNano Inc., has shown; specifically, its halloysite nanocomposites.

Fueling the Skin

Some of the raw material sources for alternative fuels also are sourced for the production of personal care ingredients. Palm oil, extracted from palm tree fruit, is used in both bio-diesel fuel and personal care products. Due to biodiesel demand, the price of palm oil has risen. Additionally, the deforestation of palm trees has turned many personal care companies away from using palm oil for environmental reasons.

Heating Up the Preservative Debate

A possible solution to the preservative-free cosmetic formulation conundrum may lie in the milk pasteurization process. Ultra-high-temperature (UHT) sterilization is the process of heating milk or cream to temperatures exceeding 275°F.

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