Visually Indicating Wipe Efficacy and Other Topics: Literature Findings

Jan 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Charles Fox, Independent Consultant
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Title: Visually Indicating Wipe Efficacy and Other Topics: Literature Findings
patentsx antiagingx caffeine for UVBx MMPsx antioxidants and sunscreensx heat shock proteinx wipesx
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Keywords: patents | antiaging | caffeine for UVB | MMPs | antioxidants and sunscreens | heat shock protein | wipes

Abstract: This survey of patent and research literature describes moneymaking ideas for personal care product development, including enhancing avobenzone photostability in the presence of zinc oxide with a phosphate-based emulsifier, adding value to sunscreen protection with antioxidants, indicating wipe efficacy visually, and using Heat Shock Protein 27 for anti-aging, among others.

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C Fox, Technically Speaking—Visually indicating wipe efficacy and other topics: Literature findings, Cosm & Toil 125(1) 18-26 (Jan 2010)

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This survey of patent and research literature describes moneymaking ideas for personal care product development, including enhancing avobenzone photostability in the presence of zinc oxide with a phosphate-based emulsifier, adding value to sunscreen protection with antioxidants, indicating wipe efficacy visually, and using Heat Shock Protein 27 for antiaging, among others.

Skin and Skin Care

Antiaging clinical efficacy: Watson et al. have published on the clinical efficacy of a cosmetic antiaging product. Few over-the-counter (OTC) antiaging products have been subjected to rigorous double-blind, vehicle-controlled efficacy trials. The authors had previously observed that the application of an antiaging product to photoaged skin under occlusion for 12 days stimulated the deposition of fibrillin-1, suggesting its potential to repair and possibly improve photoaged skin. The researchers therefore examined a similar OTC antiaging product using a patch test assay over a 6-month, double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT), with a further 6-month open phase to assess the clinical efficacy in photoaged skin.

For the patch test, a commercially available test product and its vehicle were applied, occluded for 12 days to photo-aged forearm skin (n = 10) prior to biopsy, and fibrillin-1 was immunohistochemically assessed. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was used as a positive control. Sixty photoaged subjects were recruited to the RCT, and the test product and vehicle (n = 30) were applied once daily for six months to the face and hands. Clinical assessments were performed at recruitment and following 1, 3 and 6 months of use. Skin biopsies of twenty-eight volunteers were taken (test product n = 15; vehicle n = 13) for immunohistochemical assessment of fibrillin-l from the dorsal wrist at baseline and after six months of treatment. All volunteers received the test product for six additional months and final clinical assessments were performed at the end of this open period.

In the 12-day patch test assay, the researchers observed significant immunohistological deposition of fibrillin-1 in skin treated with the test product and ATRA, compared with the untreated baseline (P = 0.005 and 0.015, respectively). In the clinical RCT, the test product significantly improved facial wrinkles at six months, compared with the baseline assessment (P = 0.013), whereas vehicle-treated skin was not significantly improved (P = 0.11).

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Footnotes

aHispagel 200 (INCI: Glycerin (and) Glyceryl Polyacrylate) is a product of Cognis, Monheim am Rhein, Germany.
bLamesoft PO 65 (INCI: Coco-Glucoside (and) Glyceryl Oleate) is a product of Cognis, Monheim am Rhein, Germany.
cEmulgin VL 75 (INCI: Lauryl Glucoside (and) Polyglyceryl-2 Dipolyhydroxystearate (and) Glycerin) is a product of Cognis, Monheim am Rhein, Germany.
dCarbopol Ultrez 10 (INCI: Carbomer) is a product of Lubrizol Advanced Materials/Noveon Consumer Specialties, Cleveland, USA.
eDermasoft 688 (INCI: Fragrance (parfum) (and) p-Anisic Acid) is a product of Dr. Straetmans, Hamburg, Germany.
fKunipia F (INCI: Bentonite) is a product of Kunimine Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo.
gSH200C-200 cs (INCI: Dimethylpolysiloxane) is a product of Dow Corning Toray, Tokyo.
hArquad 22-80 (INCI: Behenyltrimethyl-ammonium Chloride) is a product of Lion Akuzo.
jKF 6011 (INCI: Polyether Silicone) is a product of Shin-Etsu.
kFloraesters K 20W (INCI: Hydrolyzed Jojoba Esters (and) Water (aqua)) is a product of Floratech, Chandler, AZ, USA.
mEmulsiphos (INCI: Potassium Cetyl Phosphate (and) Hydrogenated Palm Glycerides) is a product of Symrise, Holzminden, Germany.
nCrodafos CES (Cetearyl Alcohol (and) Dicetyl Phosphate (and) Ceteth-10 Phosphate) is a product of Croda USA, Edison, NJ, USA.
pMontanov 202 (INCI: Arachidyl Alcohol (and) Behenyl Alcohol (and) Arachidyl Glucoside) is a product of Seppic, Paris.

Biography: Charles Fox, Independent Consultant

Charles Fox

The belated Charles Fox was an independent consultant to the cosmetics and personal care industry. Formerly the director of product development for the personal products division of Warner-Lambert Company, he was also a past recipient of the Cosmetic Industry Buyers and Suppliers Award and the Society of Cosmetic Chemists Medal Award. He also served as president of the SCC.

Formula 1. Gel-cream skin treatment10

Cyclohexasiloxane (and) cyclopentasiloxane (DC 246, Dow Corning Toray) 5.00% w/w
Hydrogenated polyisobutene 5.00
Xanthan gum 0.40
Acrylates/C10-30 alkyl acrylate crosspolymer (Pemulen-TR2, Lubrizol/Noveon) 0.25
Glycerin 5.00
Dimethicone PEG-7 phosphate (Pecosil PS-100, Pheonix Chemical) 2.00
Carbomer 0.40
Sodium hydroxide 0.30
Preservatives qs
Water (aqua) qs to 100.00

Formula 2. Lipstick composition15 (in parts by weight)

Pentaerytrityl isostearate/caprate/caprylate/adipate (Supermol L, Croda) 21.70 p/wt
Macadamia ternifolia seed oil 18.70
Octyldodecyl stearate 18.70
bis-Diglyceryl polyacyladipate-2 (Softisan-649, Sasol) 2.70
PEG-45/dodecyl glycol copolymer (Elfacos ST 9, Akzo Nobel) 7.40
Hydrogenated castor oil dimer dilinoleate 2.70
Pigments 5.00
Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate 3.70
Fragrance (parfum) 0.40
Polyglyceryl-3 beeswax 7.50
Microcrystalline wax 7.60
Mica (and) iron oxide (and) titanium oxide 3.90

Formula 3. Moisturizing lotion15

Cyclomethicone (Dow Corning 245 Fluid, Dow Corning) 17.35% w/w
Cyclopentasiloxane (and) dimethicone crosspolymer (DC 9040 Elastomer Gel, Dow Corning) 18.00
Dimethicone/PEG-10/15 crosspolymer (KSG-210, Shin-Etsu) 18.33
Propylparaben 0.20
Ethylene/acrylic acid copolymer (EA-209, Kobo Products) 7.00
Vinyl block copolymer (dispersant) 1.00
Pigment 2.00
Glycerin 25.00
Water (aqua) 8.00
Skin care actives 3.00
Methylparaben 0.12

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