Zygem, Advalytix to Produce DNA Extracts for R&D Applications

Oct 20, 2008 | Contact Author | By: Katie Schaefer
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Title: Zygem, Advalytix to Produce DNA Extracts for R&D Applications
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Zygem Corp., Ltd., and the Advalytix product team of Olympus Life Science Research Europa GmbH will join forces to produce a private-label line of DNA extraction products. This collaboration will combine Zygem’s enzymatic nucleic acid extraction technology with Advalytix’s knowledge of single-cell molecular tests for life science research and diagnostic applications--for example, where polymerase chain reactions (PCR) are required to isolate or validate the presence of a gene or marker of interest.

According to ZyGEM, its DNA extraction technology uses a proprietary thermophilic enzyme to extract DNA from samples using a single closed-tube system. This approach is said to simplify laboratory workflow, minimize errors, reduce the risk of contamination and ensure sample integrity, while also reducing costs. The technology can be specifically formulated for use with a wide range of different sample types without the need for further purification. This DNA extraction technology has been validated for use in research, forensic, diagnostic, agriculture and animal health applications.

“...[This] DNA extraction technology provides important advantages that are especially relevant as demand for DNA analysis continues to increase," said Paul Kinnon, CEO of Zygem, in press announcement. According to the Zygem, the kits are designed to work with Advalytix’s single-cell molecular diagnostics and its miniaturized diagnostic and biological tests for R&D. In a press statement issued by Frank Feist, executive director of the Advalytix business, Olympus America, this combined effort is said to enable researchers to “conduct analyses and experiments more simply, rapidly, accurately and cost effectively." Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Personal care R&D using DNA markers for claims substantiation has grown with advances made in the development of actives. For those formulators working in the growing field of cosmetic actives, this innovation could provide a new tool to simplify a complicated task.