A Review of Skin Hypopigmentation and Contemporary Strategies to Achieve an Even Skin Tone

Sep 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Cecilia Teran, Durant Scholz, Julie Cava, Kathleen Norris, Erica Babson and Dale Hana, Active Concepts
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Title: A Review of Skin Hypopigmentation and Contemporary Strategies to Achieve an Even Skin Tone
skin lighteningx hypopigmentationx whiteningx melaninx even skin tonex
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Keywords: skin lightening | hypopigmentation | whitening | melanin | even skin tone

Abstract: Whether formulating for Asia, North America, Europe or Latin America, the cosmetic chemist will face one common demand in all these markets: an even skin tone. This article provides an overview of chemical and biological agents capable of causing hypopigmentation via interactions through different stages of the melanogenic pathway.

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C Teran, D Scholz, J Cava, K Norris, E Babson and D Hana, A review of skin hypopigmentation and contemporary strategies to achieve an even skin tone, Cosm & Toil 127(9) 644-648 (Sep 2012)

Market Data

  • Peptides are spreading beyond their core facial care market; melanin-activating peptides (MAPs) are gaining momentum in self-tanning.
  • Self-tanning accounts for only 5% of the global sun care market.
  • Self-tanning is restricted to developed markets, with North America and Western Europe making up almost 80% of total sales.
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Many consumers have scars, sunspots or other unwanted dark spots that seem to have appeared overnight. These are all caused by hyperpigmentation, i.e., an increase in melanin production as a direct result of damage. Whether it is an old scar on the knee, or freckles scattered across the shoulders from an afternoon at the beach, both are caused by alterations in melanogenesis.

Melanin is the inherent compound responsible for pigmentation and it is found in the hair, skin and eyes. It plays an important role in protecting skin from the harmful effects of UV radiation and in scavenging toxic drugs and chemicals. Biological agents interfere with pigmentation through different mechanisms—ranging from interaction during the initial stages of melanogenesis, to the destruction of the melanocyte—and this article will focus on the key ones: tyrosinase inhibition, maturation and degradation; MITF inhibition; downregulation of MC1R; interference with melanosome transfer; and desquamation and peeling.

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This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Figure 1. Structure of arbutin

Figure 1. Structure of arbutin

Arbutin, a natural β-glycoside of hydroquinone, was the first alternative to hydroquinone discovered.

Footnotes [Teran 127(9)]

a AC DermaPeptide Lightening (INCI: Lactobacillus Ferment Lysate Filtrate) is a product of Active Concepts, LLC.

b The MatTek Melanoderm Assay is manufactured by MatTek Corp.

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