Recent in Claims/Labeling (page 5 of 7)

Is Cosmetic Science Really "Bad"? Part V: Who do you think you are fooling?

In previous installments of this series, the author applied Michael Shermer's Baloney Detection Kit, which includes ten questions to ask to validate a science, to cosmetic science. Having previously applied the first eight questions, the author addresses the final two in this installment.

FDA Cracks Down on Medicinal Claims Regarding Bee By-products

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cracked down on Wisconsin-based Beehive Botanicals Inc. after the company did not comply with requests to remove and change misbranded and unapproved claims from its Web site and labels.

Certifying Hair Product Claims

Claims for hair products generally are not associated with clear cut outcomes. Therefore, consumers have no standard by which to compare product efficacy. In relation, the North American Hair Research Society (NAHRS) has proposed standards for hair product claims, outlined here, which relate to characteristics including frizz, color fastness and curl retention, among others.

Translating Data into Claims and Interpreting Regulations: Science vs. Marketing

Substantial evidence, which the FDA requires to support claims for drugs, is applicable to personal care, especially considering the pharmaceutical direction products have taken. The present article considers whether the industry is benefiting from marketing without assuming the responsibility for potential effects. In addition, it considers the limitations of in vitro and in vivo test models.

Is Cosmetics Science Really "Bad"? Part III: Evidence to Support Claims in the Real World

This is the third column of a series that applies Michael Shermer's "Baloney Detection Kit" to cosmetic science. This column tackles the fourth, fifth and sixth of ten core questions included in the "kit": those relating to claims substantiation.

Net Contents of a Cosmetic: The ‘E’ Mark and Units of Measure

Recently, some European Union member states have expressed concern over the misuse of the Estimated Symbol (℮), often referred to as the “e” mark, on product labels. In addition, some regulators have argued that the International System of Units, known as the metric system, should be used on all product labels to indicate the net contents of a finished product. Both of these concerns have fueled the present column in which the author debates how product labels should indicate the net contents of a cosmetic product. In closing, he comments on the jurisdiction of the CPSC in the United States.

Israel Manufacturers Association Creates Label for Dead Sea Products

The Israel Manufacturers Association has developed a quality label for skin care products that are formulated with ingredients from the Dead Sea.

AHPA Supports Organic Certification of Soaps by NOP

The American Herbal Products Association filed comments in support of a document drafted by the US Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program that suggests certifying and labeling soaps "organic" or "made with" under the Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA).

NAD Urges Cessation of Botox-like Claims for One Antiwrinkle Product

The National Advertising Division (NAD) has recommended that the Botox-like claims made for one OTC wrinkle treatment be discontinued after the test data submitted was deemed insufficient.

Labeling Claims

Little is more confusing to marketers and cosmetic formulators than product claims regulations. Questions regarding the rules commonly arise.

EU Adapts Global Harmonized System of Chemical Labeling

This new regulation is a self-classification system for companies that identifies hazardous chemicals and informs users of their presence through standard symbols and phrases on the packaging labels, and through safety data sheets.

Recent Changes in US Regulations

Two recent changes to regulations will significantly impact the industry in 2009. These include changes to over-the-counter (OTC) labels, and the latest amendment to the Lacey Act.

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