ECM-derived Tetrapeptide to Counterbalance ECM Degeneration

Jun 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Mike Farwick, Ursula Maczkiewitz, Peter Lersch, Evonik Goldschmidt GmbH; Tim Falla, Helix Biomedix Inc.; and Susanne Grether-Bech and Jean Krutmann, Heinrich-Heine-University
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Title: ECM-derived Tetrapeptide to Counterbalance ECM Degeneration
peptidesx antiagingx collagenx hyaluronic acidx fibronectinx
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Keywords: peptides | antiaging | collagen | hyaluronic acid | fibronectin

Abstract: Degradation of dermal and epidermal proteins and the reduced proliferation of collagen and hyaluronic acid in the dermis occur during aging. Thus, antiaging technologies must to correct these deficiencies to induce skin regeneration and combat the signs of aging. Data presented here demonstrates that ECM-derived tetrapeptides have the potential to counterbalance ECM degeneration.

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The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the structural backbone of many tissues, especially the skin, and represents a main target for cosmetic applications. ECM proteins are believed to play a pivotal role in cellular migration, proliferation and gene regulation during wound healing. Fragments from ECM constituents have been found capable of stimulating ECM biosynthesis to compensate for tissue destruction.1 Their mechanisms have been implicated in wound healing, skin aging and skin’s response to UV irradiation;2, 3 from this knowledge, new actives have evolved, as the authors describe here.

Building from the concept that ECM constituents stimulate ECM biosynthesis, bioinformatic methods were employed to identify highly repetitive amino acid motifs with inherent antiaging activities. Several dozens of tetrapeptides were found scattered across sequences of the major ECM macro- molecules.Ten peptides showed the desired effect of significantly increasing collagen protein in supernatant, thus verifying the underlying assumption that breakdown products of ECM proteins stimulate the ECM neosynthesis.

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Table 1. Primer pairs

 Table 1. Primer pairs

Figure 1. In vitro effects of GEKG

 Figure 1. In vitro effects of GEKG

Figure 2. Topical application of GEKG

 Figure 2. Topical application of GEKG

Figure 3. Photographs of one volunteer’s skin

 Figure 3. Photographs of one volunteer’s skin

Farwick ECM footnotes

 aTego Pep 4-17 (INCI: Tetrapeptide-21 (and) Glycerin (and) Butylene Glycol (and) Water (aqua)), is a product of Evonik Goldschmidt GmbH.

bEMEM is a product of Life Technologies GmbH, Eggenstein, Germany.
cFetal Calf Serum is a product of Greiner, Frickenhausen, Germany. 
dThe RNeasy Total RNA Mini Kit is a product of Qiagen.
eBioPhotometer is a product of Eppendorf.
fSuperScript III First-Strand Synthesis System is a product of InVitrogen.
gPrimer Express 2.0 Software is a product of Applied Bio Systems.
hThe Opticon 1 machine is a device from MJ Research, Waltham, MA, USA.
jThe SYBR Green PCR Master Mix software is a product of Applied Biosystems.
kThe Sircol Collagen Assay is a product of Biocolor. 
mThe Visioscan VC 98 is a device of Courage & Khazaka Electronic GmbH.
 

Formula 1. Sample cream used for in vivo tests

 Formula 1. Sample cream used for in vivo tests

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