Uncovering Stability Issues: The Obvious and Not So Obvious

Jan 13, 2014 | Contact Author | By: Peter Tsolis, The Estée Lauder Companies; and Angle D. Camacho, Bayport Laboratories
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author
Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Uncovering Stability Issues: The Obvious and Not So Obvious
stabilityx separationx coalescencex product breakagex surface sweatingx stability testingx centrifugationx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: stability | separation | coalescence | product breakage | surface sweating | stability testing | centrifugation

Abstract: Troubleshooting most stability concerns in cosmetic formulations typically starts at the usual raw material classes comprising the skin care and makeup ingredient list. In skin care systems, the emulsification system, thickening ingredients, actives and emollients are usually examined. In a makeup formulation, structural items such as waxes and fillers are usually reviewed, as well as film-formers and colorants.

View citation for this article

P Tsolis and A Camacho, Uncovering Stability Issues: The Obvious and Not So Obvious, Cosm & Toil 128(11) 794 (2013)

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Developing a stable cosmetic product requires understanding and reacting to information gathered throughout the formulation process. To ensure a quality product is produced, the scientist must conduct various stability tests to identify issues that may arise. Although some issues may seem obvious, it is better to use the actual outcomes of several tests to form a proper formulation plan. Once the problem is identified, it is prudent to find a quick manner to assess progress and ensure long-term formulation stability to guarantee success; and having instabilities develop quicker will shorten the formulation time.

While it may seem that formula stability would have the same meaning to most of the cosmetic industry, it can vary from company to company. In a recent European conference, consumer attendees were asked, “What would you consider a stable personal care product?” The most common answer was a product that would not be compromised if left in a hot car for a period of time. Although this answer may seem extreme and “less scientific” to some, it exemplifies the high expectations that consumers have, which cosmetic scientists must strive to accomplish. After all, the interior of a car can quickly become as high as 140°F (60°C) in approximately 90 min on a hot, sunny day.1

Troubleshooting most stability concerns in cosmetic formulations typically starts at the usual raw material classes comprising the skin care and makeup ingredient list. In skin care systems, the emulsification system, thickening ingredients, actives and emollients are usually examined. In a makeup formulation, structural items such as waxes and fillers are usually reviewed, as well as film-formers and colorants. Though modifying the ingredient composition must be considered, formulators should rule out any processing or raw material issues first. Adding a non-uniform thickener, for example, can cause an erratic low viscosity dial reading or formula splitting.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

Close

Biography: Peter Tsolis, The Estée Lauder Companies

Peter Tsolis

Peter Tsolis has held various positions within The Estée Lauder Companies R&D for the past 14 years, ranging from innovation to business and brand development. He is an active member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and has presented on skin care formulation, delivery systems and new technology. His research interests include innovative technology, optimizing formulas and marketing.

Biography: Angle D. Camacho

Angle D. Camacho is director of R&D and manufacturing at Bayport Laboratories, which he established in 2010. He has more than 15 years of experience in the cosmetic industry, including eight years as a chemist at The Estée Lauder Companies, and more than three years as director of R&D and manufacturing for Bissu Cosmetic. He earned a degree in chemical engineering from the University of Matanzas in 1993, and is an active member of the SCC.

Next image >