Bruise Amelioration and Skin Benefits from Glycerin and Triglyceride

May 9, 2014 | Contact Author | By: C. Scott Danos, MPH Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (Ret.)
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Title: Bruise Amelioration and Skin Benefits from Glycerin and Triglyceride
glycerinx glycerin/triglyceridex bruise ameliorationx
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Keywords: glycerin | glycerin/triglyceride | bruise amelioration

Abstract: Ameliorating the appearance of bruises can be accomplished by combining glycerin and triglyceride in a skin care formulation that functions both as a humectant and occlusive agent, as described here.

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CS Danos, Bruise Amelioration and Skin Benefits from Glycerin and Triglyceride, Cosm & Toil 129(6) 50-56 (Jul/Aug 2014)

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The ability to improve the appearance of bruises on skin is of interest to the consumer. Bruises are a common occurrence and generally result in the discoloration and swelling of skin. This cosmetically unappealing condition is caused in part by damage to blood vessels as a result of trauma. Therefore, cosmetic formulations that ameliorate the appearance of bruises to make them less cosmetically unappealing have been sought by consumers.

To ameliorate the appearance of bruises, the formulation of a specified glycerin and triglyceride preparation is described here. It functions both as a humectant and occlusive agent, attracting water to the skin and returning the skin surface to a smooth state while holding water in place. The re-establishment of a homeostatic state in skin results in a rapid dissipation of the bruise and related negative cosmetic effects. In addition to ameliorating bruises, such a preparation could support other cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications.

Bruising

Bruises affect people of all ages. Seniors living longer, more active lives experience bruises more frequently due to thinning skin or medications such as blood thinners. Beauty-conscious consumers seek relief from under-eye dark circles and/or minor dermatologic or cosmetic procedures. Active consumers in general recognize the benefits of bruise relief products following routine sports and/or exercise-related activities. Even children, as they progress from infants to young adults, get bumps that cause bruises.

A bruise is a condition caused by distress to the tissue that breaks capillaries under the skin, allowing blood to escape and build up. As time progresses, blood seeps into the surrounding tissues, causing the bruise to darken and spread. The damaged capillary endothelium releases endothelin, a hormone that causes narrowing of the blood vessel to minimize bleeding. As the endothelium is destroyed, the underlying blood glycoprotein known as von Willebrand factor is exposed and initiates coagulation, which creates a temporary clot to plug the wound, eventually restoring the tissue.

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Table 1. Natural triglyceride sources

Table 1. Natural triglyceride sources

Triglycerides useful in the preparation of the described formulations are natural and may include any of the above.

Table 2. First Evaluation Scoring System

Table 2. First Evaluation Scoring System

First Evaluation Scoring System

Table 3. Second Evaluation Scoring System

Table 3. Second Evaluation Scoring System

Second Evaluation Scoring System

Table 4. Evaluation of MSDP Results

Table 4. Evaluation of MSDP Results

Evaluation of MSDP Results

Table 5. Human Forearm Tests (HFT)

Table 5. Human Forearm Tests (HFT)

Evaluation of HFT Results

Figure 1. Triglyceride structure

Figure 1. Triglyceride structure

A triglyceride is an ester derived from glycerol and three fatty acids conforming to this structure.

Figure 2. A translucent, thick dispersion was observed

Figure 2. A translucent, thick dispersion was observed

Despite the fact that the formulation was predominantly glycerin and water-soluble, the formulation rendered a glass substrate hydrophobic, indicating a way to keep hydrophilic humectants on the skin in a hydrophobic formulation.

Figure 3. Formula separation observed

Figure 3. Formula separation was observed

Formula separation was observed with non-optimized formulations.

Optimized Formula 1

Optimized Formula 1

Optimized Formula 1, based on evening primrose oil

Non-optimimized Formula 2

Non-optimimized Formula 2

Non-optimized Formula 2 based on evening primrose oil

Non-optimized Formula 3

Non-optimized Formula 3

Non-optimized Formula 3 was based on olive oil.

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