Beyond Bounderies

Nov 1, 2010 | Contact Author | By: Rachel Grabenhofer, Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine
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Title: Beyond Bounderies
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Althought I've been around cosmetics R&D for some time, I still find it interesting how a change in hair care brand can really make my hair feel and behave differently. For instance, I recently bought a different shampoo and conditioner to use during my trip to the IFSCC Congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After my return, I went back to the old brand to finish it off—and what a difference.

Granted, it could have been variations in water between the hotel and home, change in climate, etc., but I certainly liked the feel of the other, new products better; and I have not used the old products again since then. This fundamental observation from a fairly average consumer justifies the complex, behind-the-scenes work conducted by product developers. It also attests to the fact that building better products builds user loyalty.

While this information is not news to most product developers, when added to feedback from hundreds of other consumers, it becomes solid research that helps drive the product development process. Consider me one set of datapoints on your broader spider chart.

Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine aims to support formulators in building better products via the highly focused content it provides, and this edition is no exception. For example, making its debut, “Formulas Deciphered” is a new column by Eric Abrutyn that looks at the components of finished products to give formulators a better idea of why they are built the way they are. This month’s theme is facial wash.

Formulators will learn how to build structured shampoos that can combine with and stabilize actives for various hair care benefits, such as deposition of silicone or natural oils, color protection, etc. In addition, the delivery of protein into hair is measured via fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy, which can be used to optimize hair formulas. The development and application of a peptide to influence melanogenesis and lighten skin is described.

Finally, a collection of color formulas to provide formulators with new ideas in this ever-changing segment.

We hope this edition builds your loyalty to the Cosmetics & Toiletries brand by inspiring you to build products that go beyond consumer expectations and the boundaries of spider charts.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article that appeared in the Nov. 1, 2010 issue of Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine. If you would like a copy of the complete article, please contact us at customerservice@cosmeticsandtoiletries.com.