Recent in In vivo (page 3 of 5)

Determining Korean Consumers’ Degree of Exposure to Lipstick and Face Creams

This study describes methods used in a Korean study to calculate consumer exposure to lipstick and face creams. The average amount applied daily was estimated and compared with data collected by weighing containers before and after use. The data collected was 1.8 to 1.6 times greater than the estimate, so although the survey represented real use patterns, the actual data was more accurate.

Determining Korean Consumers’ Degree of Exposure to Lipstick and Face Creams

This study describes methods used in a Korean study to calculate consumer exposure to lipstick and face creams. The average amount applied daily was estimated and compared with data collected by weighing containers before and after use. The data collected was 1.8 to 1.6 times greater than the estimate, so although the survey represented real use patterns, the actual data was more accurate.

Using In vivo and In vitro Testing for Evidence-based Development of Anti-aging Ingredients

The need for a conceptual approach to skin aging, the need to combine in vitro and in vivo findings and the new direction for cosmetic ingredient manufacturers are discussed here.

Clinical Evaluation of a Zinc- and Copper-based Eye Area Anti-aging Complex

A zinc and copper complex generating biomimetic electricity on a physiological level is shown here to improve the signs of photoaging in preclinical and clinical studies. This complex was applied to the eye area to confirm its efficacy as an anti-aging treatment option with good skin tolerance.

Substantiating Skin Care Claims

Evalulab will discuss its clinical testing services specializing in the safety and efficacy of skin care products, to root product claims in science.

Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation

Although cellulite is not considered a disease, it is a significant cosmetic problem for many post-adolescent women. Recent studies using new diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound imaging can define the cellulite-reducing efficacy of cosmetics. However, there is still a need to standardize and objectify the testing procedures and to find parameters to measure anti-cellulite efficacy.

Fluid Skin Imaging for Better Resolution

Noninvasive subcutaneous skin imaging is a tool sought for use by the medical, pharmaceutical and personal care industries, but techniques have been lacking due to resolution and speed constraints.

Researcher Develops Probe for Non-invasive Below Skin Imaging

Jannick Rolland, PhD, an optics professor at the University of Rochester in New York, has developed an optical probe equipped with a liquid lens that takes images under the skin’s surface without the use of invasive procedures.

Skin Toxicology—The Future May Be Orange

Here, industry expert Johann Wiechers, PhD, discusses the frequent use of percentages by toxicologists to calculate skin penetration. To relate this discussion to modern day events, Wiechers describes the skin penetration of orange paint, used by fans of the Dutch national football team.

Evaluating 1,3-Propanediol for Potential Skin Effects

In the present article, the authors assess the skin irritation and sensitization potential of 1,3-propanediol (INCI: Propanediol). Results in animals and humans by acute or repeat exposure support a low potential of skin reactivity for the material. In addition, the skin reactivity potential in humans was found to be lower with 1,3-propanediol than 1,2-propanediol (INCI: Propylene Glycol).

Predicting the Percutaneous Penetration of Cosmetic Ingredients

While previous algorithms for predicting the skin absorption of permeants was based on in vitro data, the present article proposes a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model based on in vivo human data. Here, a set of human in vivo data is described that provides entry into predicting the penetration of cosmetic ingredients.

Is Cosmetic Science Really "Bad"? Part IV: How Scientific is Cosmetic Science?

Six questions from Michael Shermer’s Baloney Detection Kit have been discussed in this series. The results were not flattering for cosmetic science (read: cosmetic scientists) but cosmetic science did not score badly on all points. Questions seven and eight, described here, discriminate true science from borderland science and non-science or nonsense.

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