Collagens I and III, and Elastin Activation for Anti-aging

Feb 24, 2014 | Contact Author | By: D. Auriol and G. Redziniak Libragen; and H. Chajra, K. Schweikert and F. Lefevre, Induchem
Your message has been sent.
(click to close)
Contact the Author

Suppliers Referenced

Save
This item has been saved to your library.
View My Library
(click to close)
Save to My Library
Title: Collagens I and III, and Elastin Activation for Anti-aging
methyl-glucoside-6-phosphatex tropoelastinx collagens I and IIIx pro-collagen Ix elastinx senescent fibroblastsx extracellular matrixx skin agingx
  • Article
  • Media
  • Keywords/Abstract
  • Related Material

Keywords: methyl-glucoside-6-phosphate | tropoelastin | collagens I and III | pro-collagen I | elastin | senescent fibroblasts | extracellular matrix | skin aging

Abstract: As an alternative to semi-invasive facial rejuvenation techniques, the authors developed an active ingredient to reactivate senescent fibroblasts by stimulating metabolic pathways for collagens I and III, and elastin. The biological activity of the resulting ingredient is investigated here using in vitro models, ex vivo explants and human volunteers.

View citation for this article

D. Auriol, G. Redziniak, H. Chajra, K. Schweikert and F. Lefevre, Collagens I and III, and Elastin Activation for Anti-aging, Cosm & Toil 129(2) 70 (2014)

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Skin chronological aging, also called intrinsic aging, has been characterized on a microscopic level by reductions in total collagen content, elastin synthesis1 and hyaluronic acid content. These reductions are due, in part, to the cells involved becoming senescent and losing their synthesis capabilities.2 Decreases in these skin components further lead to decreased skin thickness, modifications of skin anisotropy, and the loss of skin firmness and elasticity, which are visible at the macroscopic level.

Numerous skin treatments and dermatological procedures, ranging from noninvasive to invasive, are available to promote youthful skin. Such treatments include topical retinoids, glycolic acid, botulinum neurotoxin, soft tissue fillers,3 lasers,4 radio frequency, microneedle stimulation, surgical procedures, endocrine therapies and mesotherapy.5 Over the last decade, interest has increased for minimally invasive techniques, particularly for facial rejuvenation. For example, the injection of fillers6 such as collagen and hyaluronic acid into soft tissue has more frequently been performed.

The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with good biocompatibility, and therefore cause minimal side effects. However, all dermal fillers induce transient adverse effects—including pain, discomfort, redness, bruising and swelling—and can sometimes even induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects such as granuloma and infections.7–10 Currently, the major dermal fillers used are based on hyaluronic acid, but since their filling effects are transient, lasting for only six to nine months,3, 11, 12 patients must undergo multiple time-consuming and expensive injection sessions to maintain satisfactory effects.12, 13 On the other hand, collagen-based fillers last no longer in the skin than hyaluronic acid products, and also present drawbacks due to their animal origin—such as the risk of virus and/or bacterial contamination from animals to humans. They also can induce significant allergic reactions due to their protein content.14, 15

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

Suppliers Referenced

If you would like to receive more information or product samples from relevant companies, please select which ones below

Your information

Cancel

Media

Figures

 

Close

Table 1. Effect of the active ingredient on normal young fibroblast viability after 72 hr of incubation (MTT test)

Table 1. Effect of the active ingredient on normal young fibroblast viability after 72 hr of incubation (MTT test)

In young fibroblasts, cell viability improved by 26%, 42% and 61%, respectively with 0.08%, 0.40% and 2.0% of the ingredient (see Table 1).

Table 2. Effect of the active ingredient on normal aged fibroblast viability after 72 hr of incubation (MTT test)

Table 2. Effect of the active ingredient on normal aged fibroblast viability after 72 hr of incubation (MTT test)

In aged fibroblasts, the improvement of cell viability was 17%, 21% and 36% at the same respective concentrations (see Table 2).

Table 3. Collagen type I content in human skin explants with or without active ingredient at 0.5% (image quantification analysis)

Table 3. Collagen type I content in human skin explants with or without active ingredient at 0.5% (image quantification analysis)

In the present study, clear stimulation of collagen type I synthesis was observed in the aged skin explants topically treated with 0.5% of the active ingredient, compared with untreated explants at D6 and D11 (see Figure 2 and Table 3).

Table 4. Collagen type III content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Table 4. Collagen type III content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

For collagen type III, at D11, a statistically significant 192% increase in its synthesis was observed in the treated conditions versus the untreated ones (see Figures 4 and 5, and Table 4).

Table 5. Tropo-elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Table 5. Tropo-elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Interestingly, application of the active on skin explants stimulated both tropoelastin (see Table 5 and Figure 6) and elastin synthesis (Table 6 and Figure 7); compared with untreated explant at D11, the active ingredient statistically increased the synthesis of tropoelastin by 56% and elastin by 189%.

Table 6. Elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Table 6. Elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Interestingly, application of the active on skin explants stimulated both tropoelastin (see Table 5 and Figure 6) and elastin synthesis (Table 6 and Figure 7); compared with untreated explant at D11, the active ingredient statistically increased the synthesis of tropoelastin by 56% and elastin by 189%.

Table 7. Quantity of light received (inversely correlated to collagen density)

Table 7. Quantity of light received (inversely correlated to collagen density)

Equal results also were observed after 60 days (see Table 7), proving a long-lasting skin-thickening effect.

Table 8. Determination of anisotropy index

Table 8. Determination of anisotropy index

The active ingredient significantly improved skin’s micro-relief by reducing the anisotropy of the skin after 15 days, by 12%, and through 60 days, by 8% (see Table 8).

Table 9. Measurement of skin firmness and elasticity (R7 parameter)

Table 9. Measurement of skin firmness and elasticity (R7 parameter)

The data shows that the active significantly improved skin firmness and elasticity by 11% after 15 days of treatment; it also significantly improved firmness and elasticity in comparison with the placebo at D60 (see Table 9).

Table 10. Calculation of wrinkle depth (Fringe projection technique)

Table 10. Calculation of wrinkle depth (Fringe projection technique)

The topical application of the active ingredient significantly decreased the depth of wrinkles by 15% and the volume of wrinkles by 13% (see Tables 10 and 11, respectively) at D15, in comparison with the placebo.

Table 11. Calculation of wrinkle volume (Fringe projection technique)

Table 11. Calculation of wrinkle volume (Fringe projection technique)

The topical application of the active ingredient significantly decreased the depth of wrinkles by 15% and the volume of wrinkles by 13% (see Tables 10 and 11, respectively) at D15, in comparison with the placebo.

Figure 1. Effect of the active ingredient on procollagen synthesis and/or its release by normal and aged dermal fibroblasts after 72 hr incubation (ELISA assay)

Figure 1. Effect of the active ingredient on procollagen synthesis and/or its release by normal and aged dermal fibroblasts after 72 hr incubation (ELISA assay)

The 2% active ingredient significantly stimulated pro-collagen-I synthesis in both young and senescent fibroblasts (see Figure 1).

Figure 2. Collagen type I visualization in human skin explants a) without or b) with topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; immunostaining—green fluorescence, 40 × magnification

Figure 2. Collagen type I visualization in human skin explants a) without or b) with topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; immunostaining—green fluorescence, 40 × magnification

In the present study, clear stimulation of collagen type I synthesis was observed in the aged skin explants topically treated with 0.5% of the active ingredient, compared with untreated explants at D6 and D11 (see Figure 2 and Table 3).

Figure 3. Collagen type I content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5% (image quantification analysis)

Figure 3. Collagen type I content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5% (image quantification analysis)

In comparison with D0, at D6, for both young and aged conditions, collagen type I content was decreased (see Figure 3).

Figure 4. Collagen type III visualization in human skin explants a) without or b) with the topical application of the active at 0.5%; immunostaining—pink staining, 40 × magnification

Figure 4. Collagen type III visualization in human skin explants a) without or b) with the topical application of the active at 0.5%; immunostaining—pink staining, 40 × magnification

For collagen type III, at D11, a statistically significant 192% increase in its synthesis was observed in the treated conditions versus the untreated ones (see Figures 4 and 5, and Table 4).

Figure 5. Collagen type III content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Figure 5. Collagen type III content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

For collagen type III, at D11, a statistically significant 192% increase in its synthesis was observed in the treated conditions versus the untreated ones (see Figures 4 and 5, and Table 4).

Figure 6. Tropo-elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Figure 6. Tropo-elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Interestingly, application of the active on skin explants stimulated both tropoelastin (see Table 5 and Figure 6) and elastin synthesis (Table 6 and Figure 7); compared with untreated explant at D11, the active ingredient statistically increased the synthesis of tropoelastin by 56% and elastin by 189%.

Figure 7. Elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Figure 7. Elastin content in human skin explants with or without a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; image quantification analysis

Interestingly, application of the active on skin explants stimulated both tropoelastin (see Table 5 and Figure 6) and elastin synthesis (Table 6 and Figure 7); compared with untreated explant at D11, the active ingredient statistically increased the synthesis of tropoelastin by 56% and elastin by 189%.

Figure 8. Visualization in human skin explants of elastin a) untreated and b) after a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; immunostaining—green fluorescence, 40X magnification

Figure 8. Visualization in human skin explants of elastin a) untreated and b) after a topical application of the active ingredient at 0.5%; immunostaining—green fluorescence, 40X magnification

Also, once synthesized, the elastin and tropoelastin were deposited directly on the elastic fibers in candelabra shapes, as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 9. Wrinkle depth and volume assessment of normal skin at D0 and D15 after placebo and 1% active ingredient treatments; data is from the same volunteer (67 years) treated with placebo on side A and with the active ingredient on side B

Figure 9. Wrinkle depth and volume assessment of normal skin at D0 and D15 after placebo and 1% active ingredient treatments; data is from the same volunteer (67 years) treated with placebo on side A and with the active ingredient on side B

The skin surface was smoothed after two weeks of application of the ingredient, as shown by surface analysis (see Figure 9, side B).

Footnotes (CT1403 Auriol)

a Neodermyl (INCI: Water (aqua) (and) Glycerin (and) Methyl-glucoside Phosphate (and) Copper Lysinate), Induchem

b Young (P7-NHDF) and aged (P17-NHDF) primary human fibroblasts and culture medium, Bioalternatives

c Pro-collagen I ELISA kit, ref. MK101, Takara Bio, Inc.

d Survival culture medium, Bio-EC

e, g, j Leica microtome, CM cryostat and microscope, Leica Biosystems

f, h Superfrost and silanized glass slides, Thermo Scientific

k Anti-collagen I rabbit polyclonal antibody, ref. PS047, Monosan-Tebu Bio

m Anti-collagen III goat polyclonal antibody, ref. 1330-01, SouthernBiotech

n Anti-tropoelastin mouse antibody, ref. MAB2503, EMD Millipore

p Anti-elastin rabbit polyclonal antibody, ref. 25011, Novotec

q SIAscope V scanning device, by Vita Clinika

r SkinEvidence Visio device, Laboratoires La Licorne, SA

s Cutometer MPA 580, Courage & Khazaka

t DermaTOP system, EOTECH

u Toposurf software, a part of MATLAB; Mathworks, Inc.

Next image >

 
 

Close

It's Free...

Register or Log in to get full access to this content

Registration includes:

  • Access to all premium content
  • One click ingredient sample requests
  • Save articles in the My Library tool

Create an Account or Log In