Nature-derived Care for Sensitive and Difficult-to-treat Skin Types

Jul 1, 2014 | Contact Author | By: Katerina Steventon, PhD, FaceWorkshops, LLC
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Title: Nature-derived Care for Sensitive and Difficult-to-treat Skin Types
sensitive skinx oilyx dryx TEWLx stratum corneumx seasonalx Ecocertx COSMOSx
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Keywords: sensitive skin | oily | dry | TEWL | stratum corneum | seasonal | Ecocert | COSMOS

Abstract: A number of consumers can be classified as having difficult-to-treat skin types, being both dry and oily and prone to periodical inflammation in specific areas. New active ingredients derived from nature provide gentle yet efficacious solutions to address these needs. These skin types and solutions are addressed herein.

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K Steventon, Nature-derived Care for Sensitive and Difficult-to-treat Skin Types, Cosm & Toil 129(6) 28-29 (Jul/Aug 2014)

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A number of consumers can be classified as having difficult-to-treat skin types, being both dry and oily and prone to periodical inflammation in specific areas. New active ingredients derived from nature provide gentle yet efficacious solutions to address these needs. These skin types and solutions are addressed herein.

Skin Type Studies

The conundrum of skin types was addressed in an earlier article, and research regarding the classification of different skin types has not advanced significantly since. However, one recent study shows that combination and oily skin types have (along with clinically higher shine intensity and oiliness) a greater tendency to pigment than other types. In addition, combination and oily skin types often are objectively measured to have lower barrier function—i.e., higher transepidermal water loss (TEWL)—and increased skin surface roughness.

Another study in healthy Caucasian women confirmed that women having a dry skin type also have a considerably thicker stratum corneum and tendency toward lower barrier function, compared with women having a normal skin type. Further research is required to provide the rationale for specific skin care routines to address different skin types, and these studies should pair clinical assessments of skin types with objective, non-invasive quantifications of skin properties using biophysical and imaging techniques.

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Footnotes [Steventon 129(6)]

a Pacifeel (INCI: Butylene Glycol (and) Propanediol (and) Mirabilis Jalapa Extract), Sederma, www.sederma.com

b Defensil PLUS (INCI: Octyldodecanol (and) Ribes Nigrum (Black Currant) Seed Oil (and) Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil Unsaponifiables (and) Cardiospermum Halicacabum Flower/Leaf/Vine Extract (and) Tocopherol (and) Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil (and) Rosmarinus), Rahn

c Delisens (INCI: Butylene Glycol (and) Water (aqua) (and) Citric Acid (and) Acetyl Hexapeptide-46), Lipotec

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