Hyperbranched Polyalphaolefins Enhance Anhydrous Stick Formulations

Feb 1, 2008 | Contact Author | By: Florence Nicholas and Jeff Brooks, New Phase Technologies
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Title: Hyperbranched Polyalphaolefins Enhance Anhydrous Stick Formulations
pouring temperaturex stickx synthetic waxx
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Keywords: pouring temperature | stick | synthetic wax

Abstract: Hyperbranched polyalphaolefins offer distinctive functional and aesthetic properties due to their branch-on-branch configuration. In anhydrous stick formulations containing polyethylene or other crystalline waxes, the addition of hyperbranched polyalphaolefins is shown in this article to lower pour points by as much as 10C, increase gloss, modify structure and improve formula stability.

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In today’s global personal care market- place, consumers have specialized needs based on function as well as fashion. In response, formulators strive to develop unique, high-performance products to meet rapidly evolving trends. Ingredients that combine multiple benefits offer potential for differentiated solutions while making formulation simple and more cost-effective. Among the array of product forms, cosmetic sticks are practical and easy to use. However, they can also present formulation challenges in terms of structure, stability and aesthetics.

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Table 1. Physical properties of tested HBPs

 Table 1. Physical properties of tested HBPs

Table 2. Effect of 5% HBP

 Table 2. Effect of 5% HBP 

Figure 1. Structure of hyperbranched polyalphaolefins

 Figure 1. Structure of hyperbranched polyalphaolefins

Figure 2. Pouring temperature

 Figure 2. Pouring temperature 

Figure 3. SEM of stick base structures

 Figure 3. SEM of stick base structures 

Figure 4. Gloss

 Figure 4. Gloss

Figure 5. Hardness

 Figure 5. Hardness 

Figure 6. SEM of stick base structures

 Figure 6. SEM of stick base structures

Nicholas Polyalphaolefins footnotes

 a Performa V 103 polymer (designated here as HBP-1), Performa V 260 polymer (HBP-2), Performa V 343 polymer (HBP-3) and Performa V 825 polymer (HBP-4) (all INCI: Synthetic wax) are products of New Phase Technologies, a division of Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, TX USA.

b The D48-7 Glossmeter is a product of Hunter Associates Laboratory, Reston, VA USA.

c Leneta card, a product of the Leneta Company Inc., Mahwah, NJ USA

d Examples are DC556 (INCI: Phenyltrimethicone) from Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan USA, and Indopol H (INCI: Polyisobutene) from Ineos Olefins & Polymers USA, League City, Texas USA.

e The K19500 penetrometer is a product of Koehler Instrument Company Inc., Bohemia, NY USA

 

Formula 1. Anhydrous stick base

 Formula 1. Anhydrous stick base

Formula 2. Anhydrous stick base

 Formula 2. Anhydrous stick base

Formula 3. Lip moisturizer stick

 Formula 3. Lip moisturizer stick 

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