Formula Anatomy Deciphered—BB Creams

Feb 2, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Luigi Rigano, PhD, ISPE srl
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Title: Formula Anatomy Deciphered—BB Creams
BB creamsx formulatingx emulsifiersx opacifiersx skin lighteningx moisturizerx sun protectionx anti-agingx renewalx
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Keywords: BB creams | formulating | emulsifiers | opacifiers | skin lightening | moisturizer | sun protection | anti-aging | renewal

Abstract: BB stands for “blemish balm” in Asia or “beauty balm” in some parts of Europe. It is defined loosely as product that combines serum, moisturizer, base cream, foundation and sunscreen in one. Only recently have BB creams seen popularity in the Western world, where large beauty manufacturers have launched their versions to eager consumers.

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L Rigano, Formula Anatomy Decipered: BB creams, Cosm & Toil 128(2) 88-91 (Feb 2013)

Market Data

  • Skin care consumers are seeking multifunctional products such as BB creams and products customized for specific skin problems.
  • Multifunctional products are prized for their value and convenience, and are becoming increasingly popular in beauty brands.
  • Tailored products target specific skin issues, imparting the idea that it can focus all its efforts and ingredients on solving that one problem, hopefully affecting a more immediate and impactful outcome.
  • As long as skin care remains a strong trend, both types of products will likely maintain a presence in consumers’ skin care regimens.
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The BB Cream has its origins in northern Germany in the 1960s, where dermatologist Christine Schrammek, MD, invented it to protect the skin of one of her surgically treated patients.1 These creams did not become popular until they were introduced to Korea in 1985, where they currently occupy a large market share of the cosmetic market. Skin lightening had been commonplace in Asia, but modern skin lightening products such as BB creams differ greatly from those used in the past. In Japan, the Geisha adopted many methods to lighten the face color including the application of heavy, white makeup. Following folk tradition, Chinese women ingested minced pearls to obtain skin lightening. Past lightening products have been formulated with phenol derivatives such as hydroquinone, which has been associated with side-effects. Alternatives included foundations that imparted heavy, unnatural results. Tinted moisturizers were then introduced, which were less binding and offered some pigments, but did not correct underlying skin color.

A fundamental principle of color and light physics became clear, as understood by Japanese and Korean women—a complexion cannot be bright if it does not receive illumination from the lower skin layers. This principle was well known by painters of the Renaissance who prepared the base of the canvas with a bright white to allow pigments to perform enhanced shine and brightness. Similarly, Asian women have been known to apply a thin layer of cream or “base” containing white pigments and fillers first to enhance the luminosity of skin tone provided by the foundation that followed.

BB stands for “blemish balm” in Asia or “beauty balm” in some parts of Europe. It is defined loosely as product that combines serum, moisturizer, base cream, foundation and sunscreen in one. The success of BB creams has been aided by the discovery of spheronized pigments, coated with layers of transparent materials. BB creams must be multifunctional, easy to use, have immediate results and impart a natural look. Only recently have BB creams seen popularity in the Western world, where large beauty manufacturers have launched their versions to eager consumers. Their formulation is described here.

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This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Footnotes

a Samples were validated at the Herbarium of the Natural Sciences Institute of the National University of Colombia (N° COL 530891).
b The Lambda 35 UV/Vis spectrophotometer used for this study is manufactured by PerkinElmer.
c The normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) used for this study are products of BIOalternatives.
d The Bioanalyzer FACS array used for this study is produced by BD Biosciences.
e The TriPure solution reagent and LightCycler system used for this study are products of Roche Molecular Systems.
f The PRIMOS Compact 3D system used for this study is a device by GFMesstechnik GmbH.
g The MPA 580 Cutometer used for this study is a device by Courage & Khazaka Electronic GmbH.

Formula 1. Easy-breaking w/o silicone emulsion

A.

Cyclopentasiloxane (and) PEG 10 Dimethicone (and) Disteardimonium Hectorite, 5.00 % w/w
Octyldodecanol, 3.00
Phytosteryl Hydroxystearate, 1.00
C14-15 Alkyl Carbonate, 3.00
Jojoba Oil, 1.00
Polyglyceryl 6 Polyricinoleate, 1.00
Polyglyceryl 10 Decaisostearate, 1.00
Octylmethoxycinnamate, 5.00
Cyclomethicone, 10.00
Dimethicone KF96A-6CA,  5.00
Tocopheryl Acetate, 0.20

B.

Mica (and) CI 77891 (and) 77491 (and) 77492 (and) 77499 (and) Methicone (and) Talc (FDP-C-111S 2B Toshiki), 10.00
Silica, 3.00

C.

Ethanol, 5.00
Butylene Glycol, 3.00
Preservatives, qs

D.

Dipotassium Diglycyrrhizinate, 0.20
Disodium EDTA, 0.05
Water (aqua), qs

Formula 2. BB cream

A.

Isopropyl Palmitate,  4.00 % w/w
Caprylic Capric Triglycerides, 5.00
Glyceryl Stearate, 1.00
Cetearyl Octanoate, 3.00
Dioctyl Adipate, 1.00
Dimethicone, 1.00
Steareth 21, 1.00
Steareth 2, 1.00

B.

Glycerin, 3.00
Tetrasodium EDTA, 0.02
Preservatives, qs
Buffers, qs
Water (aqua), qs to 100
Tetrahydrodiferuloyl-methane (SabiWhite, Sabinsa), 0.25
Tetrahydropiperine (Cosmoperine, Sabinsa), 0.05
Sodium Polyacrylate (and) Mineral Oil (and) Trideceth-6 (Flocare ET 75, SNF Cosmetics), 5.00

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