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Recent in Delivery (page 2 of 6)

A Delivery System for Treatment Bar Soaps

Many desired additives are not compatible with soap due to either the chemistry or the manufacturing process. Here, the authors describe an encapsulated delivery system incorporating polymers that survives the extrusion process and adheres to skin.

Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part III, Stability and Efficacy

Part I of this review on Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) discussed the differences of these two delivery systems for cosmetic actives, as well as their production methods and selection criteria for constituents. In Part II, the characterization of these nano-sized particles was considered. In Part III, presented here, their stability and efficacy are considered; Part IV will address their application in cosmetics.

Berg + Schmidt Launches Lecithin Fractions for Skin Compatibility

Berg & Schmidt has introduced a range of phosphatidylcholine (PC) fractions of lecithin from either soy or sunflower that can be used to manufacture liposomes, nanoemulsions, oleogels or formulations that are physiologically related to skin.

Review of Pseudopeptidic Compounds for Biocompatible Gels

Simple pseudopeptides derived from natural amino acids can be designed and prepared as efficient gelators for a variety of solvents, and with a high potential for biocompatibility. The appropriate selection of structural components, reviewed herein, shows how to produce gels with tailored properties, including high thermal stability.

Delivering Actives via Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Part IV, Absorption and Formulations

In this fourth part of a five-part series discusses the percutaneous absorption of actives loaded into solid lipid SLNs and NLCs and their formulation in dermal cosmetics.

Swellable, Nanoporous Organosilica for Extended and Triggered Release

Nanoporous organosilica particles were developed to swell upon the addition of organic solvents. These are evaluated here for encapsulating and controlling the release of fragrance. Slower, continuous release was observed, suggesting their ability to extend sensory benefits. In addition, the stimulated release of encapsulated lidocaine was studied, and results implicate their use to deliver cosmetic actives.

Delivering On Time, In Full and On Target: Part II

This second installment continues a discussion from Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine’s May 2008 issue and is also based on a chapter written for the book Skin Barrier: Chemistry of Skin Delivery Systems. Practical information for the cosmetic formulator regarding optimization of skin delivery has been added.

Swellable, Nanoporous Organosilica for Extended and Triggered Release

Nanoporous organosilica particles were developed to swell upon the addition of organic solvents. These are evaluated here for encapsulating and controlling the release of fragrance. Slower, continuous release was observed, suggesting their ability to extend sensory benefits. In addition, the stimulated release of encapsulated lidocaine was studied, and results implicate their use to deliver cosmetic actives.

Saccharide Isomerate to Deeply Hydrate Skin and Scalp

Saccharide isomerate, designed to closely resemble a carbohydrate complex found in human stratum corneum, is shown here to provide up to 72 hr of deep hydration to skin and, for the first time, rinse-off soothing to the scalp. Its unique binding mechanism to skin and scalp create new opportunities for leave-on and rinse-off products.

Triggering Controlled Release of Fragrance

This column examines some of the recent patent literature on triggers for controlled release of fragrance and was, itself, triggered by a reading of Andreas Herrmann’s recent review of pro-fragrances in Angewandte Chemie.

Formulation Fantasies: A Discussion

Numerous claims made in the popular press misrepresent the facts about formulations, and cosmetic science is not well-served by this. Here, the authors examine a number of such statements. The influence of skin creams and formulations on the penetration of actives must be communicated in a responsible manner to the public if the industry is to banish prevalent myths.

Smart Materials for Triggered Release of Cosmetics

Smart polymers can be engineered to contain reactive molecules, commonly dubbed “molecular switches,” that respond to external stimuli and cause systemic changes to the polymer structure. The specificity of a molecular switch to a single stimulus is critical for controlled release, although multi-triggered systems capable of responding to systematic stimuli are being developed for advanced applications. Herein the authors describe several stimuli-responsive materials that have potential applications for personal care and related biomedical fields.

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