Recent in SPF Testing (page 1 of 3)

SPF Tests Reveal No Ideal In vitro Substrate Exists

In vitro SPF measurements are challenged by reproducibility, repeatability and correlation with in vivo values. Here, the authors assess sunscreen adhesion to the test substrate support, since poor adhesion produces bad results. Surface substrates are characterized by functional group, charge, wettability and surface morphology. Eight w/o and o/w emulsions also are tested. Results indicate an ideal in vitro test substrate does not exist.

New Sunscreen Allows Body to Produce Vitamin D

Researchers discovered altering ingredients in sunscreens allows the body to produce vitamin D, which led to a new sunscreen development called Solar D.

Improving the UV Exposure of Sunscreen During In vitro Testing

In any sun protection evaluation method, an irradiation step is required to determine the photostability of the UV filters in a product. The aim of this study was to identify key parameters involved to improve this UV exposure. Here, the authors consider temperature at the substrate surface, air flow influence and beam uniformity during UV exposition.

Sandblasting to Improve the Reproducibility of In vitro Sunscreen Evaluation

SPF test results from substrates treated using a traditional sandblasting technique are compared with those from substrates treated using a new process. Based on the topographic control of 10 batches and 34 sunscreen evaluations, the authors concluded the new process had better topographic reproducibility, consequently improving the SPF repeatability and reproducibility in vitro.

Influence of Pressure During Spreading on UV Transmission Results

This work evaluates the impact of applied pressure during sample spreading on the in vitro measurement of UV transmission. The authors work in a range of pressures between 50–200 g and demonstrate that pressure control is a key parameter that should be strictly controlled to ensure the reliability of test results.

Influence of Pressure During Spreading on UV Transmission Results

This work evaluates the impact of applied pressure during sample spreading on the in vitro measurement of UV transmission. The authors work in a range of pressures between 50–200 g and demonstrate that pressure control is a key parameter that should be strictly controlled to ensure the reliability of test results.

In Vitro UV Testing—Robot vs. Human Spreading for Repeatable, Reproducible Results

Repeatability and reproducibility are crucial to validate any test method. In order to master these criteria, the authors developed an automated spreading device and compared it with human spreading. Application of the device in eight laboratories and using 36 sunscreens revealed great improvements via automated spreading, ensuring good intra- and inter-laboratory variability.

In Vitro UV Testing—Robot vs. Human Spreading for Repeatable, Reproducible Results

Repeatability and reproducibility are crucial to validate any test method. In order to master these criteria, the authors developed an automated spreading device and compared it with human spreading. Application of the device in eight laboratories and using 36 sunscreens revealed great improvements via automated spreading, ensuring good intra- and inter-laboratory variability.

Solar Flair

If like me, you’re just daydreaming of the beach, this collection of articles will enlighten you with its focus on sun protection, SPF testing, damage repair and more.

In vitro/vivo SPF Correlation and Repeatability According to Substrate

This work evaluates the impact of three different substrates on in vitro SPF measurements, and defines experimental conditions to improve their correlation with in vivo values. Evaluations of 32 products, shown here, led the authors to conclude that molded substrates improved repeatability and correlation with in vivo SPF values.

Testing SPF 15–100, Indoor vs. Outdoor

Lab tests on sunscreens show it takes more energy to produce mild erythema on protected skin than unprotected skin. Yet the FDA questions the need for SPFs higher than 50. In response, two outdoor studies were conducted using commercial products to challenge standing premises and determine if there is a measurable difference in an SPF 100 and SPFs of 50 or less.

Testing Sun Protection Factor in Skin

There are various test methods set by global governing bodies for SPF protection, but this article will discuss the five time-point internationally approved ISO 24444 method.

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