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Recent in SPF Testing (page 1 of 3)

SPF Debate Puts Derms to the Test

Is the word we're spreading about sunscreen efficacy wrong? A new paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association thinks so. It holds that SPF values above 30 do make a difference.

The Best Sunscreen? The One People Will Use.

This guest advisor commentary comes from regular Cosmetics & Toiletries contributor and photochemistry expert Craig Bonda, president of Inception Partners, LLC, and technical consultant to the sunscreen industry.

IFSCC Has Some Fun with Sun

Sunscreen failure, SPF as a myth, an alternative vitamin D and others were topics of discussion at the sun care session during the IFSCC Congress. Following are some highlights.

SPF Testing: Who's Got Their 'Backs?'

"Isn’t it time for governments and industry to standardize an in vitro SPF test to replace human testing?" Karl Laden, Ph.D., of Alpa Cosmetics, asks in this brief commentary. What do you think?

SPF Tests Reveal No Ideal In vitro Substrate Exists

In vitro SPF measurements are challenged by reproducibility, repeatability and correlation with in vivo values. Here, the authors assess sunscreen adhesion to the test substrate support, since poor adhesion produces bad results. Surface substrates are characterized by functional group, charge, wettability and surface morphology. Eight w/o and o/w emulsions also are tested. Results indicate an ideal in vitro test substrate does not exist.

New Sunscreen Allows Body to Produce Vitamin D

Researchers discovered altering ingredients in sunscreens allows the body to produce vitamin D, which led to a new sunscreen development called Solar D.

Improving the UV Exposure of Sunscreen During In vitro Testing

In any sun protection evaluation method, an irradiation step is required to determine the photostability of the UV filters in a product. The aim of this study was to identify key parameters involved to improve this UV exposure. Here, the authors consider temperature at the substrate surface, air flow influence and beam uniformity during UV exposition.

Sandblasting to Improve the Reproducibility of In vitro Sunscreen Evaluation

SPF test results from substrates treated using a traditional sandblasting technique are compared with those from substrates treated using a new process. Based on the topographic control of 10 batches and 34 sunscreen evaluations, the authors concluded the new process had better topographic reproducibility, consequently improving the SPF repeatability and reproducibility in vitro.

Influence of Pressure During Spreading on UV Transmission Results

This work evaluates the impact of applied pressure during sample spreading on the in vitro measurement of UV transmission. The authors work in a range of pressures between 50–200 g and demonstrate that pressure control is a key parameter that should be strictly controlled to ensure the reliability of test results.

Influence of Pressure During Spreading on UV Transmission Results

This work evaluates the impact of applied pressure during sample spreading on the in vitro measurement of UV transmission. The authors work in a range of pressures between 50–200 g and demonstrate that pressure control is a key parameter that should be strictly controlled to ensure the reliability of test results.

In Vitro UV Testing—Robot vs. Human Spreading for Repeatable, Reproducible Results

Repeatability and reproducibility are crucial to validate any test method. In order to master these criteria, the authors developed an automated spreading device and compared it with human spreading. Application of the device in eight laboratories and using 36 sunscreens revealed great improvements via automated spreading, ensuring good intra- and inter-laboratory variability.

In Vitro UV Testing—Robot vs. Human Spreading for Repeatable, Reproducible Results

Repeatability and reproducibility are crucial to validate any test method. In order to master these criteria, the authors developed an automated spreading device and compared it with human spreading. Application of the device in eight laboratories and using 36 sunscreens revealed great improvements via automated spreading, ensuring good intra- and inter-laboratory variability.

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