Most Popular in:

Method Development/Validation

New in Method Development/Validation (page 4 of 200)

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.

Nov 01, 2010 | 01:40 PM CDT

Electrifying Skin Delivery

By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries…

Iontophoresis is a well-known, noninvasive method that uses a small electric charge to deliver chemicals through the skin. However, according to Gregory Schultz, PhD, and Daniel Gibson, a professor and doctoral candidate, respectively, at the University of Florida, this method of delivery can have its drawbacks. Together with co-inventor, Sonal Sanjeev Tuli, MD, the team developed a method to iontophorese macromolecules into tissue such as the skin without causing damage; however, initial research focused on the eye.