Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation

May 1, 2011 | Contact Author | By: K. Bazela, PhD; R. Debowska, PhD; B. Tyszczuk; K. Rogiewicz, PhD; and I. Eris, PhD, Dr. Irena Eris Cosmetic Laboratories; R. Mlosek, PhD, Medical University of Warsaw; and A. Nowicki, PhD, Institute of Fundamental Technological Research
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Title: Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation
cellulitex efficacy testingx skin condition analysisx ultrasonographyx
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Keywords: cellulite | efficacy testing | skin condition analysis | ultrasonography

Abstract: Although cellulite is not considered a disease, it is a significant cosmetic problem for many post-adolescent women. Recent studies using new diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound imaging can define the cellulite-reducing efficacy of cosmetics. However, there is still a need to standardize and objectify the testing procedures and to find parameters to measure anti-cellulite efficacy.

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K Bazela, R Debowska, B Tyszczuk, K Rogiewicz, I Eris, R Mlosek and A Nowicki, Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation, Cosm & Toil

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Cellulite is considered an endocrine metabolic microcirculatory disorder that causes interstitial matrix alterations and structural changes in subcutaneous adipose tissue.1 It is localized mainly on the thighs, buttocks and occasionally the abdomen, and it is characterized by an orange peel or cottage cheese appearance. Approximately 85% of women worldwide are concerned by cellulite.1

Although the cellulite pathogenesis is not fully understood, a variety of circulatory and structural changes have been identified that contribute to the orange peel appearance of the skin. First, the capillary networks of the dermis are impaired from the breakdown in blood vessel integrity, which causes fluid retention and clumping of engorged fat cells in the subcutaneous tissue. The aggregation of adipose cells and the growth of collagen fibrils further hamper microcirculation, leading to dermal metabolism reduction. Moreover, dermal thinning occurs in response to minimized protein synthesis and reduced degradation. Adipose cells isolated from nutrition and toxins removal swell to micronodules that finally agglomerate to macronodules.1–4

Cellulite is a concern for many women. Therefore, appropriate research to investigate treatment options and objective methods measuring its efficacy are warranted. The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of an anti-cellulite product using noninvasive investigation techniques. The key skin condition parameters measured include moisturization, roughness and the thickness of subcutaneous tissue.

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Figure 1. Skin moisturization after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

Figure 1. Skin moisturization after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

Application of the anti-cellulite cream for two and four weeks led to an increase in corneometer values, i.e. hydration levels, compared with the baseline, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 2. Skin roughness after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

Figure 2.  Skin roughness after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

Consistent application of the product also resulted in a decrease in the number, depth and volume of skin folds (volume parameter) compared with the baseline, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 3. Ultrasonografic analysis of subcutaneous tissue thickness after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

Figure 3. Ultrasonografic analysis of subcutaneous tissue thickness after four weeks with anti-cellulite cream-gel

As shown by Figure 3, the thickness of the subcutaneous tissue decreased after four weeks of anti-cellulite cream-gel application.

Figure 4. Ultrasonografic image comparison of the human thigh skin: a) without cellulite, and b) with cellulite to show uneveness of the dermal/subcutis border and subcutaneous protrusion into dermis

Figure 4. Ultrasonografic image comparison of the human thigh skin: a) without cellulite, and b) with cellulite to show uneveness of the dermal/subcutis border and subcutaneous protrusion into dermis

Moreover, in the data collected, the herniation of the hypodermis into the dermis was observed, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 5. Volunteers’ evaluation of the cosmetic benefits of the anti-cellulite cream-gel

Figure 5. Volunteers’ evaluation of the cosmetic benefits of the anti-cellulite cream-gel

They described their skin after the product’s application as being more elastic, smooth, moisturized and as having less cellulite. This self-perception data is shown in Figures 5 and 6.

Figure 6. Volunteer evaluation of the anti-cellulite cream-gel properties

Figure 6. Volunteer evaluation of the anti-cellulite cream-gel properties

They described their skin after the product’s application as being more elastic, smooth, moisturized and as having less cellulite. This self-perception data is shown in Figures 5 and 6.

Anti-cellulite Test Formula

The described test formula included the following ingredients:
Water (aqua), Glycerin, Alcohol Denat., Sodium Polyacrylate, Dimethicone, Propylene Glycol, Cyclopentasiloxane, Trideceth-6, Polysilicone-11, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Extract, Hydrolyzed Cucurbita Pepo (Pumpkin) Seedcake, Allantoin, PEG/PPG-18/18 Dimethicone, L-Ergthioneine,  Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry) Fruit Extract, Chlorphenesin, Methylparaben, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylparaben, Butylparaben, Propylparaben, Isobutylparaben, Fragrance (parfum), CI 42090, CI 19140.

Footnotes (CT1105 Bazela)

aThiotaine (INCI: L-Ergothioneine) is a product of Barnet Products Corp., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA.
b The Multi Probe Adapter (MPA) 5 device;
c Corneometer CM 825 probe;
d Visioscan camera; and e SELS 2000 software all are manufactured by Courage-Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Köln, Germany.
f Aplio XG is a device manufactured by Toshiba, Tokyo.
g The experimental device, named µScan, was created by a research team led by A. Nowicki, PhD, at the Polish Academy of Science.

Formula 2. Shampoo and hair conditioner

Formula 2. Shampoo and hair conditioner1

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