Recent in In vivo (page 2 of 4)

Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation

Although cellulite is not considered a disease, it is a significant cosmetic problem for many post-adolescent women. Recent studies using new diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound imaging can define the cellulite-reducing efficacy of cosmetics. However, there is still a need to standardize and objectify the testing procedures and to find parameters to measure anti-cellulite efficacy.

The Air Up There: Skin VOCs

In 2001, Japanese researchers reported that after the age of 40, some individuals develop a malodor known as “aging odor,” attributed to the presence of unsaturated C9, 2-nonenal. George Preti, PhD, a member of Monell Chemical Senses Center and an adjunct professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, was interested by this report and began to conduct research of his own.

Determining Korean Consumers’ Degree of Exposure to Lipstick and Face Creams

This study describes methods used in a Korean study to calculate consumer exposure to lipstick and face creams. The average amount applied daily was estimated and compared with data collected by weighing containers before and after use. The data collected was 1.8 to 1.6 times greater than the estimate, so although the survey represented real use patterns, the actual data was more accurate.

Fluid Skin Imaging for Better Resolution

Noninvasive subcutaneous skin imaging is a tool sought for use by the medical, pharmaceutical and personal care industries, but techniques have been lacking due to resolution and speed constraints.

Comparison of Age Determination by Three Evaluation Methods: Self-assessment, Expert Grader and Naïve Grader

This exploratory study investigates how consumers perceive age, using objective and subjective approaches. Results of this study suggest that when a subjective approach is implemented for age determination, subjects affix their emotions to the evaluation. The reverse logic was applicable for the expert and naïve grader methods, as grader results appeared more neutral than the self-assessment.

Comparison of Age Determination by Three Evaluation Methods: Self-assessment, Expert Grader and Naïve Grader

This exploratory study investigates how consumers perceive age, using objective and subjective approaches. Results of this study suggest that when a subjective approach is implemented for age determination, subjects affix their emotions to the evaluation. The reverse logic was applicable for the expert and naïve grader methods, as grader results appeared more neutral than the self-assessment.

Evaluating 1,3-Propanediol for Potential Skin Effects

In the present article, the authors assess the skin irritation and sensitization potential of 1,3-propanediol (INCI: Propanediol). Results in animals and humans by acute or repeat exposure support a low potential of skin reactivity for the material. In addition, the skin reactivity potential in humans was found to be lower with 1,3-propanediol than 1,2-propanediol (INCI: Propylene Glycol).

Predicting the Percutaneous Penetration of Cosmetic Ingredients*

While previous algorithms for predicting the skin absorption of permeants was based on in vitro data, the present article proposes a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model based on in vivo human data. Here, a set of human in vivo data is described that provides entry into predicting the penetration of cosmetic ingredients.

Mechanisms of Tape Stripping and Protein Quantification*

In this article, several methods to quantify the protein collected by tape stripping are described, including traditional gravimetric methods as well as novel colorimetric and visible spectroscopic techniques. Further, one colorimetric method is described to effectively determine the keratolytic efficacy of various materials in vivo, suggesting additional roles for this method.

A High Throughput Method to Predict Skin Penetration and Screen Topical Formulations

This work studies the applicability of a 96-well-based skin-mimetic artificial membrane permeability model to differentiate between topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. Results are compared with data obtained from in vitro Franz cell permeability measurements and reveal the applicability of this method to assess cosmetic formulation permeation and speed the discovery process.

A High Throughput Method to Predict Skin Penetration and Screen Topical Formulations

This work studies the applicability of a 96-well-based skin-mimetic artificial membrane permeability model to differentiate between topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. Results are compared with data obtained from in vitro Franz cell permeability measurements and reveal the applicability of this method to assess cosmetic formulation permeation and speed the discovery process.

Consumer Perception of Fine Lines and Wrinkles Assessed by Qualitative Methods

There are varying definitions, associations and overall impressions of fine lines and wrinkles among different consumer segments. The findings of this study offer invaluable insight into consumers’ opinions, and by qualitative in-depth interviews, they provide a well-defined vernacular for aging descriptors. This language is critical for developmental research, consumer evaluation and marketing within the cosmetic industry.

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