In Vitro Model for Decontamination of Human Skin

Apr 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Hongbo Zhai, MD, University of California; and Howard I. Maibach, MD, University of California School of Medicine
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Title: In Vitro Model for Decontamination of Human Skin
decontaminationx in vitrox
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Keywords: decontamination | in vitro

Abstract: The present study utilized an in vitro model to compare the decontamination capacity of three model decontaminant solutions: tap water, isotonic saline and hypertonic saline. Human cadaver skin samples were dosed with radio-labeled [14C]-formaldehyde and the surface skin of each sample was washed after each exposure with one of the three model decontaminant solutions.

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Decontamination of a chemical from skin is often an emergency measure. The present study utilized an in vitro model to compare the decontamination capacity of three model decontaminant solutions: tap water, isotonic saline and hypertonic saline. Human cadaver skin samples were dosed with radio-labeled [14C]-formaldehyde and the surface skin of each sample was washed after each exposure with one of the three model decontaminant solutions.

After washing, the skin was stripped with tape discs and the wash solutions, strippings, receptor fluid and remainder of skin were counted to measure the amount of formaldehyde present. An evaporation test was also conducted to monitor the percentage of formaldehyde evaporation.

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Table 1. Decontamination capacity to 14C-formaldehyde post-topical administration of a) 1 min, b) 3 min and c) 30 min on human skin in vitro; data is shown as mean ± SD of mass (µg) and percent dose (%)

Table 1. Decontamination capacity to 14C-formaldehyde post-topical administration of a) 1 min, b) 3 min and c) 30 min on human skin in vitro; data is shown as mean ± SD of mass (µg) and percent dose (%)

Table 1. Decontamination capacity to 14C-formaldehyde post-topical administration of a) 1 min, b) 3 min and c) 30 min on human skin in vitro; data is shown as mean ± SD of mass (µg) and percent dose (%)

Figure 1. Formaldehyde in wash solution

Formaldehyde in wash solution

Formaldehyde in wash solution; data is shown as mean ± SD of mass (µg)

Figure 2. Formaldehyde evaporation test

Formaldehyde evaporation test

Formaldehyde evaporation test; (closed circle) = observed individual evaporation; (open circle) and – (line) = predicted evaporation

Footnotes

a The formaldehyde used for this study is a product of Sigma-Aldrich Company, St. Louis, USA.

b The saline products used for this study are a product of VWR International, West Chester, Pa., USA.

c Cadaver skin samples were obtained from the Northern California Transplant Bank.

d The balanced salt solution used for this study is a product of In Vitro Scientific Products Corp., St. Louis, USA.

e The D-squame tape discs used for this study are a product of Cuderm Corp., Dallas, USA.

f UniverSol Liquid Scintillation Fluid is a product of MP Biomediclas, Costa Mesa, Calif., USA.

g The Tri-Carb 2900TR scintillation analyzer used for this study is a device from PerkinElmer Inc., Wellesley, Mass., USA.

h The SigmaStat computer program used for this study is a product of SPSS Science, Chicago, USA

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