Evaluating Water Permeability and Occlusion in Wound Dressings and Topical Cosmetics

Jul 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Hongbo Zhai, MD, and Howard I. Maibach, MD, University of California
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Title: Evaluating Water Permeability and Occlusion in Wound Dressings and Topical Cosmetics
permeabilityx waterx occlusionx wound dressingsx
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Keywords: permeability | water | occlusion | wound dressings

Abstract: The present study uses an evaporimeter to measure the degree of water loss from in vitro skin samples covered by occlusive and semi-occlusive wound dressings to serve as a model for determining the effectiveness of occlusive cosmetic formulations. The purpose of this work was to develop a model for determining the effectiveness of occlusive cosmetic formulations.

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Occlusion refers to covering the skin by any means of film or substance;1 this extends to wound dressings, which can be differentiated as being fully occlusive or semi-occlusive. Wounds are either covered or left exposed to air and while studies have shown that occlusion may speed the healing process of wounds faster than air exposure,2,3 completely occlusive dressings have some disadvantages, particularly when compared to semi-occlusive dressings.For instance, if bacteria are trapped under the wound dressing, the fully occlusive dressing provides a warm and moist environment for the bacteria to reproduce, potentially leading to infection.5

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Figure 1. TEWL changes with dressings of variously degreed occlusivity.

CT0907 Zhai Figure 1

Data was shown as mean ±SD of TEWL (g/m2/h).

Footnotes

aParafilm laboratory film is a product of Pechiney Plastic Packaging (Menasha, WI).
bBand-Aid adhesive bandages are a product of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company (Skillman, NJ).
cDermacryl 79 (INCI: Acrylates/Octylacrylamide Copolymer) is a product of National Starch and Chemical Company (Bridgewater, NJ).
dThe human cadaver skin used in this study was obtained from the Northern California Transplant Bank.
eEagle’s MEM with Earle’s BSS was obtained from In Vitro Scientific Products Corp. (St. Louis, MO).
fThe Vapometer used in this study is a device from Delfin Technologies Ltd., Finland.
gSigmaStat software from SPSS Science in Chicago was used for this study.

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