Screening Botanical Ingredients: Challenges and Opportunities

Jul 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Patricia da Luz Moreira, PhD, Natura Inovaçã e Tecnologia de Produtos Ltda., São Paulo, Brazil
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Title: Screening Botanical Ingredients: Challenges and Opportunities
high throughput screeningx “omicsx ” botanical extractsx compound libraryx biological pathwayx
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Keywords: high throughput screening | “omics | ” botanical extracts | compound library | biological pathway

Abstract: Botanical ingredients are interesting for their unique and complementary chemical diversities yet they are criticized for these very traits, which make quality assurance, reproducibility and good phytochemical characterization—required for successful high throughput screening, difficult. This article discusses these challenges as well as the benefits of large-scale screenings of botanical extracts that are currently used or developed for cosmetic product development.

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P da Luz Moreira, Screening botanical ingredients: Challenges and opportunities, Cosm & Toil 127(7) 516-519 (Jul 2012)

Market Data

  • Global demand for organic personal care was more than $7.6 billion in 2012, and is expected to reach $13.2 billion by 2018.
  • The global organic market has grown due to increasing consumer concerns regarding personal health and hygiene.
  • Widening distribution channels and new product development have contributed to growth.
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Until recently, the development of a botanical ingredient for cosmetic use has been a long and tedious process. This was typically initialized by defining the mechanism of action, which is sometimes based on the interactions of users with plants, i.e., ethnobotanical influences, including diverse popular and cultural traditions; in addition to determining the endpoints to be evaluated to screen the ingredient for performance; and searching the available literature to identify natural sources for some molecules that already have been described as having effects on those endpoints. After the initial theoretical prospecting using literature or popular knowledge, the development process of the botanical ingredient finally begins.

Botanical ingredients are interesting for their unique and complementary chemical diversities yet they are criticized for these very traits, which make quality assurance, reproducibility and good phytochemical characterization—required for successful high throughput screening, difficult. This article discusses these challenges as well as the benefits of large-scale screenings of botanical extracts that are currently used or developed for cosmetic product development.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Figure 1. The evolution of omics and HTS techniques

Figure 1. The evolution of omics and HTS techniques

The evolution of omics and HTS techniques, considering their biological relevance, costs and availability

Footnotes [Moreira 127(7)]

a Taxol is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb.

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