In vitro

Recent in In vitro (page 4 of 11)

A Rapid and Sensitive In vitro Method to Ascertain Antioxidative Capacity*

New methodologies have recently been developed to determine antioxidant effects but they often require extensive training and are time-consuming to conduct. In the present article, however, the authors describe an in vitro method to detect the effects of antioxidant-containing formulations using photochemiluminescence to provide rapid, accurate and sensitive measurements.

Beiersdorf Researcher Develops Skin Imaging Method for Analysis

Beiersdorf has created a new method of skin analysis to help it develop new skin care products.

Influence of Skin Diffuse Reflectance on Sun Damage and Ingredient Efficacy Measurements

Current in vitro methods to assess photostability and antioxidant activity do not account for the diffuse reflectance of skin. Described here is an in vitro test that addresses this variable, mimics end-use product conditions and models photodamage processes. The approach is employed to determine the efficacy of an antioxidant from the Camellia sinensis (tea) plant.

Hair Ethnicity and Ellipticity: A Preliminary Study

Ethnic hair care addresses diverse fiber compositions that require unique products. This comprehensive review in hair fiber dimensions among straight, wavy and curly/coily hair serves as a basis from which product developers can design products to cater to unique hair type needs. The current study examines the ellipticity of Caucasian, Brazilian, Hispanic and African-American hair.

Hair Ethnicity and Ellipticity: A Preliminary Study

Ethnic hair care addresses diverse fiber compositions that require unique products. This comprehensive review in hair fiber dimensions among straight, wavy and curly/coily hair serves as a basis from which product developers can design products to cater to unique hair type needs. The current study examines the ellipticity of Caucasian, Brazilian, Hispanic and African-American hair.

The Effect of Skin Metabolism on the Absorption of Chemicals

Skin expresses enzymes that can metabolize endogenous molecules but little is known regarding how they impact the delivery of xenobiotics. This review of recent works shows that skin metabolism alters the dermal absorption of lipophilic compounds, which opens new areas of investigation regarding the safety and efficacy of topically applied cosmetics.

Influence of Skin Diffuse Reflectance on Sun Damage and Ingredient Efficacy Measurements

Current in vitro methods to assess photostability and antioxidant activity do not account for the diffuse reflectance of skin. Described here is an in vitro test that addresses this variable, mimics end-use product conditions and models photodamage processes. The approach is employed to determine the efficacy of an antioxidant from the Camellia sinensis (tea) plant.

The Effect of Skin Metabolism on the Absorption of Chemicals

Skin expresses enzymes that can metabolize endogenous molecules but little is known regarding how they impact the delivery of xenobiotics. This review of recent works shows that skin metabolism alters the dermal absorption of lipophilic compounds, which opens new areas of investigation regarding the safety and efficacy of topically applied cosmetics.

'Land'scaping-Ho!

For the current picture, Cosmetics & Toiletries knows many of the headaches you endure; for example, regulations and scale-up. It would take volumes to address all the challenges these pose, but this issue covers two specific aspects of them.

‘How Did THAT Get in There?’ Identifying Particulate Contamination in Products and Packaging

Particulate contamination and discoloration may occur in products due to foreign materials introduced via raw materials or during the manufacturing process. Agglomeration or reactions between ingredients and packaging components also are possible sources. The identification of contaminants and their origin, described here, is therefore critical so that future incidents can be prevented and safety or regulatory concerns can be addressed.

Inducing Hormesis for a Lipofilling-like Action

The present article discusses a new approach to mimic lipofilling—the activation of hormesis, which is accomplished by the described encapsulated active designed to induce a transitory stress and initiate an overcompensation to reestablish homeostasis. This leads to the compensation of age-induced lipoatrophy and correction of wrinkles and folds, for a younger-looking appearance.

Designing Mild Personal Care Products: A Case Study

This article reviews the mechanisms underlying skin irritation and sensitization, and methods used in a case study to test cosmetic products for their potential to cause irritation. It also covers the main skin conditions that can influence susceptibility to irritation, as well as ingredients affecting the mildness of cosmetic products.

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