Recent in In vitro (page 1 of 9)

SILAB Introduces Reconstructed Skin Models

SILAB Research has created SILABSKIN multi-layer reconstructed epidermis or skin models to test the efficacy of its natural cosmetic actives in vitro.

DSM Discovers Efficacy in ReguScence

DSM’s new research findings confirmed the efficiency in even skin tone application from the ingredient, ReguScence.

Marigold Extract Photoprotection Breakthrough

Kemin reported new in vitro studies confirm the blue-light-absorbing capacity of its marigold-derived FloraGLO Lutein Topical product.

A Novel Explant Model for Skin Delivery Assessment

Mechanisms implied in the skin absorption process and the role of cutaneous metabolism are of increasing interest to cosmetics research. In the present paper, the authors demonstrate how an experimental human skin explant model exhibiting great barrier function and metabolic activities can provide an understanding of what happens to cosmetic actives when they are topically applied.

Zeta Potential and Particle Size to Predict Emulsion Stability

Emulsions are popular vehicles in skin care due to their affinity for the skin; however, they are thermodynamically unstable systems. This study investigates zeta potential and particle size distribution as potential screening tools to predict instabilities in emulsion-based cosmetic products, to supplement regular accelerated stability testing.

Collagens I and III, and Elastin Activation for Anti-aging

As an alternative to semi-invasive facial rejuvenation techniques, the authors developed an active ingredient to reactivate senescent fibroblasts by stimulating metabolic pathways for collagens I and III, and elastin. The biological activity of the resulting ingredient is investigated here using in vitro models, ex vivo explants and human volunteers.

Measuring the Water Content of Hair

Consumers have demonstrated a clear desire for hair that isn’t “dried out” while also demonstrating a clear distaste for the effects of high humidity on hair. To find the balance in creating products, it is necessary to have an accurate means of measuring hair’s water content. This article describes equipment used to perform this task while highlighting experimental variables that can produce suspect results and lead to incorrect conclusions.

Wise Words From the Bench With Sergio Nacht, PhD

Today, product formulation goes hand in hand with efficacy testing, but nearly 40 years ago, when Sergio Nacht, PhD, started out in the personal care industry, it was a different story. Throughout his decades in personal care, Nacht has developed methodologies that have allowed the personal care industry to establish efficacy of a product and convey this to the consumer. He has also been instrumental in the increased efficacy of personal care products through sustained release.

IBN Engineers Hair Follicle Model for Development of Anti-hair loss Actives

The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has recently engineered a new hair follicle model that could help discover new drugs or active ingredients for hair regeneration.

Analyzing Deposition from Rinse-off Hair Products

The most common approach to determine ingredient deposition on hair is to analyze the treated tresses, but this poses several challenges. Instead, the authors describe a novel approach based on determining the amount of ingredient collected in the rinse water, and back-calculating the amount deposited on hair. Development and validation efforts discussed here use polydimethylsiloxane as a model compound.

In Vitro Methods to Test Materials for Ozone Protective Capabilities

Many markers can be used to indicate epidermal stress. Therefore, it becomes clear that the skin is also a sensitive target to ozone exposure and one that could greatly benefit from cosmetic or personal care materials designed to protect against ozone.

Sensitive Skin Syndrome: Methodological Approaches

Manufacturers of topical products perform rigorous testing to assure that their products are safe for consumers. Of particular interest is determining whether products will irritate the skin of the approximately 50% of consumers surveyed who consider themselves to have “sensitive” skin.