Recent in Testing (page 13 of 19)

Significant Statistical Differences in Sensory Research

My dictionary has two definitions of the term significant. As others have pointed out, a research finding may be true without being important. When statisticians say a result is “highly significant,” they mean it is very probably true. Importance and meaning are determined by the consumer.

Characterizing Roughness: A New Substrate to Measure SPF

Here, the authors describe a variable that affects the results of SPF testing in vitro—the roughness parameter—and investigate this variable using standard and molded poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates. They conclude that use of a molded substrate, along with the described control chart, improves the reproducibility of in vitro SPF test results.

Alternatives to Animal Testing: A Review of Trends and Perspectives

Alternative test methods have the potential to reduce animal testing; however, the extent to which in vitro methods can be replaced is questionable. This article summarizes validated alternatives to test the safety of cosmetic ingredients. It also illustrates how great a challenge it is to devise a proper alternative method.

Rapid Colorimetric Analysis of para-Phenylenediamine in Henna-based, Non-permanent Tattoo Color Mixtures

In some henna mixtures, para-phenylenediamine (PPD) has illegally been added and it is responsible for complications such as allergic contact dermatitis. While high-performance liquid chromatography has previously been used to detect PPD, a colorimetric method that is faster and portable, described here, has been developed. For product developers, this method can be used to evaluate henna plant extracts.

Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation

Although cellulite is not considered a disease, it is a significant cosmetic problem for many post-adolescent women. Recent studies using new diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound imaging can define the cellulite-reducing efficacy of cosmetics. However, there is still a need to standardize and objectify the testing procedures and to find parameters to measure anti-cellulite efficacy.

In Sight—QOL Testing: Complementing Clinicals

Personal care efficacy tests are known to test the physical effects or toxicity of products, often omitting more abstract and possibly equally as important factors such as well-being.

Ethics, Ethics Everywhere

Nowadays, however, personal care has evolved even further to encompass the root of human being-ethics and morals, where the purchase of a personal care item relates to one’s concern about the environment and animal welfare. But the involvement of ethics does not just apply to the consumers using the products; it applies to scientists conducting safety studies.

Responsilbilities in Outsourcing Clinical Testing

It remains the responsibility of the manufacturer to substantiate the safety of both ingredients and finished cosmetic products prior to their being marketed.

The Air Up There: Skin VOCs

In 2001, Japanese researchers reported that after the age of 40, some individuals develop a malodor known as “aging odor,” attributed to the presence of unsaturated C9, 2-nonenal. George Preti, PhD, a member of Monell Chemical Senses Center and an adjunct professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, was interested by this report and began to conduct research of his own.

UV Transmission Assessment: Influence of Temperature on Substrate Surface

This work evaluates the impact of temperature on test substrate surfaces during the application, spreading and drying steps of the in vitro method to measure ultraviolet (UV) transmission. The authors work in a range between 20°C and 35°C, and demonstrate that controlling temperature is a key test parameter that should be strictly controlled to ensure reliability.

Determining Korean Consumers’ Degree of Exposure to Lipstick and Face Creams

This study describes methods used in a Korean study to calculate consumer exposure to lipstick and face creams. The average amount applied daily was estimated and compared with data collected by weighing containers before and after use. The data collected was 1.8 to 1.6 times greater than the estimate, so although the survey represented real use patterns, the actual data was more accurate.

‘How Did THAT Get in There?’ Identifying Particulate Contamination in Products and Packaging

Particulate contamination and discoloration may occur in products due to foreign materials introduced via raw materials or during the manufacturing process. Agglomeration or reactions between ingredients and packaging components also are possible sources. The identification of contaminants and their origin, described here, is therefore critical so that future incidents can be prevented and safety or regulatory concerns can be addressed.

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