Recent in Testing (page 12 of 19)

Testing Tactics—Consumer vs. Scientific Language: Relating In vivo to In vitro

It should perhaps go without saying that consumer products are sold using consumer language. Market researchers and consumer scientists spend a great deal of time studying their target audience and learning this vocabulary, which subsequently allows the recounting of product benefits in the same terminology.

IBN Engineers Hair Follicle Model for Development of Anti-hair loss Actives

The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has recently engineered a new hair follicle model that could help discover new drugs or active ingredients for hair regeneration.

Testing Tactics: REACH and In vitro Alternatives: Skin Irritation Testing

Welcome back to a continuing discussion regarding the new Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) regulation and its impact on chemical testing. It is the purpose of this series of articles to provide an overview of these existing validated in vitro methods, as well as new methods that are being considered for validation.

Measuring Hair Strength, Part I: Stress-Strain Curves

This article is the first in a series that will address the approaches of measuring the “strength” of hair and quantifying the manner by which this property may be altered. Specifically, it will begin with the generation of stress-strain curves through the use of constant rate extension experiments.

A Dermatological View: Tandem Irritants With Synergistic, Additive or Quenching Effects on the Skin

In this article the results of six published tandem irritation studies are evaluated; possible mechanisms and clinical ramifications, albeit complex, are discussed. The clinical relevance of tandem irritation among cosmetics users and in many occupational settings appears obvious and suggests the need for further studies clarifying its principles and mechanisms.

Evaluating Hair Conditioning with Instrumental Combing

When formulating a hair care product, there is often a need for testing that validates the product’s technical performance. This testing provides guidance to create formulas with appropriate performance, while also communicating the product’s message to the consumer. This article discusses the use of instrumental combing measurements when formulating hair conditioning products.

Significant Statistical Differences in Sensory Research

My dictionary has two definitions of the term significant. As others have pointed out, a research finding may be true without being important. When statisticians say a result is “highly significant,” they mean it is very probably true. Importance and meaning are determined by the consumer.

Characterizing Roughness: A New Substrate to Measure SPF

Here, the authors describe a variable that affects the results of SPF testing in vitro—the roughness parameter—and investigate this variable using standard and molded poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates. They conclude that use of a molded substrate, along with the described control chart, improves the reproducibility of in vitro SPF test results.

Alternatives to Animal Testing: A Review of Trends and Perspectives

Alternative test methods have the potential to reduce animal testing; however, the extent to which in vitro methods can be replaced is questionable. This article summarizes validated alternatives to test the safety of cosmetic ingredients. It also illustrates how great a challenge it is to devise a proper alternative method.

Rapid Colorimetric Analysis of para-Phenylenediamine in Henna-based, Non-permanent Tattoo Color Mixtures

In some henna mixtures, para-phenylenediamine (PPD) has illegally been added and it is responsible for complications such as allergic contact dermatitis. While high-performance liquid chromatography has previously been used to detect PPD, a colorimetric method that is faster and portable, described here, has been developed. For product developers, this method can be used to evaluate henna plant extracts.

Noninvasive Techniques for Anti-cellulite Product Efficacy Evaluation

Although cellulite is not considered a disease, it is a significant cosmetic problem for many post-adolescent women. Recent studies using new diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound imaging can define the cellulite-reducing efficacy of cosmetics. However, there is still a need to standardize and objectify the testing procedures and to find parameters to measure anti-cellulite efficacy.

In Sight—QOL Testing: Complementing Clinicals

Personal care efficacy tests are known to test the physical effects or toxicity of products, often omitting more abstract and possibly equally as important factors such as well-being.

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