Nanocrystal Liquid Identification

Oct 1, 2011 | Contact Author | By: Katie Anderson (Schaefer), Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine
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Title: Nanocrystal Liquid Identification
nanocrystalx W-Inkx liquid identificationx packagingx
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Ian Burgess Ian Burgess

Keywords: nanocrystal | W-Ink | liquid identification | packaging

Abstract: Watermark Ink (W-Ink) utilizes chemical and optical properties of nanostructured materials to distinguish liquids based on surface tension. The nanostructured material is called an inverse opal, which is a layered glass structure with an internal network of ordered, interconnected air pores.

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K Anderson, Nanocrystal Liquid Identification, Cosm & Toil 126(10)

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The need for liquid identification exists in almost all industries. In the petroleum industry, it can be used to verify fuel grade; in the pharmaceutical industry, it can be used to validate a liquid medication; and in the personal care industry, it can be used to identify materials in a lab, check for contaminants or variations in scale-up, or possibly to research the components in benchmark products. Currently, there are chemical methods used to identify liquids; however, Ian Burgess and his team at Harvard University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)* have developed a device that identifies unknown liquids on the go and with no power source.

Watermark Ink (W-Ink) utilizes chemical and optical properties of nanostructured materials to distinguish liquids based on surface tension. The nanostructured material is called an inverse opal, which is a layered glass structure with an internal network of ordered, interconnected air pores.

Excerpt Only This is a shortened version or summary of the article you requested. To view the complete article, please log in or create an account. Registration is Free!

 

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Footnote

* The research team also included: Lidiya Mishchenko, SEAS; Benjamin D. Hatton, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering; Mathias Kolle, PhD, SEAS; Marko Lončar, PhD, SEAS; and Joanna Aizenberg, PhD, SEAS, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology.

Biography for Ian Burgess

Ian B. Burgess is a doctoral candidate in applied physics at Harvard University. His research focuses on the development of colorimetric sensors based on structural color. He received his Bachelor of Science degree with honors in mathematical physics and a minor in chemistry from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Before coming to Harvard, he held research internships at l’Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, McMaster University and the Royal Military College of Canada.

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