Fighting Cellulite with Cosmetotextiles

Sep 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: Katie Schaefer, Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine
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Title: Fighting Cellulite with Cosmetotextiles
cosmetotextilesx
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Keywords: cosmetotextiles

Abstract: Mirroring cosmetic chemists’ work, the garment industry has approached the same battle with textiles that constrict “troubled areas,” such as the buttocks and thighs, to make them appear smaller. Only recently, however, did the cosmetics and garment industries join forces to target cellulite on both fronts—enter Lytess, a France-based shape-wear company.

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Cellulite affects nearly all women and some men for most of their lives. In the past few decades, the personal care industry has responded by designing anticellulite gels and lotions to topically reduce its appearance. Cellulite-fighting ingredients today include lotus, algae and seaweed extractsa, to name a few, and anticellulite benefits have expanded into treatments, self-tanners and sun care, among others.

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Footnotes

aFor more on ingredients that target cellulite, please reference “Cellulite: Evolving Technologies to Fight the ‘Orange Peel’ Battle,” an article by Karl Lintner, PhD.

bRodhysterol (INCI: Propylene Glycol Diethylhexanoate (and) Gelidium Cartilagineum Extract) is a product of BiotechMarine.

Microcapsules in Cosmetotextiles1

Clothing acts like a kind of patch, passing onto the skin the actives retained in between the fibers. When the body is in contact with the fabric, the microcapsules (that can be figured as liposomes with their bilayers) show more affinity for the skin than for the textile fibers and slowly diffuse to the skin where the actives will be freshly released. There are also systems with a coating process that place microcapsules on the surface during the industrial manufacturing process, and systems that adopt a more flexible application onto a finished garment. The main advantage of the first system is the simplicity of a piece of clothing that need only be worn, but this advantage is usually counterbalanced by the progressive discharge with no system to restore the functionality of the textile.

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