Patent Pick: Making Cosmetics More 'Taste'ful

September 7, 2017 | Contact Author | By: Rachel Grabenhofer
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BeautyDisgustMakeup850

Keywords: LVMH patent | flavor enhancement | bitter taste | face creams | cosmetics | sunscreens | Stevia | salt | masking | fragrance

Abstract: Most formulators (and hopefully consumers) know cosmetics aren't for eating. And if you've ever grazed your lips with lotion, you know the bitter twinge that ensues. But LVMH inventors aim to improve this encounter by taking the bite out of it.

When applying creams, color foundations or sunscreens to the face, users tend to take a generous amount of cream in their hand to spread it all over, rubbing it in to ensure good penetration and even coverage. This can result in product on the lips, and many products give a very bitter taste.

To mask the bitterness of UVA and UVB sunscreens, for example, one patent proposed incorporating a particular polyoxyalkylenated polyester into products, although in this case, the products did not contain fragrance. In the patent described here, LVMH inventors noted certain products used for masking the bitterness of biological actives either are ineffective for any duration or modify the odor of the composition, especially when they contain a fragrance.

Thus, these inventors sought to solve this technical problem for fragranced cosmetics or dermatological compositions intended for the face and containing bitter compounds and fragrance. The surprising answer was in a Stevia and salt duo.

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When applying creams, color foundations or sunscreens to the face, users tend to take a generous amount of cream in their hand to spread it all over, rubbing it in to ensure good penetration and even coverage. This can result in product on the lips, and many products give a very bitter taste.

To mask the bitterness of UVA and UVB sunscreens, for example, one patent proposed incorporating a particular polyoxyalkylenated polyester into products, although in this case, the products did not contain fragrance. In the patent described here, LVMH inventors noted certain products used for masking the bitterness of biological actives either are ineffective for any duration or modify the odor of the composition, especially when they contain a fragrance.

Thus, these inventors sought to solve this technical problem for fragranced cosmetics or dermatological compositions intended for the face and containing bitter compounds and fragrance. The surprising answer was in a Stevia and salt duo.

Cosmetic composition incorporating Stevia and a salt
U.S. Patent 9750673
Publication date: Sep. 5, 2017
Assignee: LVMH Recherche

Disclosed in this invention is the use of Stevia extract in combination with a salt for masking the bitterness of compounds in cosmetic or dermatological compositions. According to the inventors, "this mixture of sweetener with a second gustatory agent" can mask the bitterness of the compound permanently without changing the nature of the fragrance or the color of the composition.

Specifically, a composition such as a facial cream, lotion, serum or fluid, foundation or sun protection product is described that includes a fragrance and an aqueous phase in which a hydrophilic organic ingredient with a bitter taste is incorporated. Examples include: xanthines, polyphenols, L-phenylalanine, urea, sucrose octaacetate, hesperidin, alpha-glucosyl hesperidin and flavonoids.

Added to the aqueous phase is a combination of 0.05-2.0% w/w of at least one steviol glucoside and 0.01-0.5% w/w of a chloride salt selected from: sodium chloride, potassium chloride, zinc chloride and mixtures thereof. The bitterness of the disclosed compounds is reportedly suppressed over time without changing the olfactory signature of the cosmetic or dermatological composition.

Patent accessed on Sept. 7, 2017