Sustainable Ingredients and Innovation in Cosmetics

Aug 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Giorgio Dell’Acqua, PhD; and Giuseppe Calloni, PhD, Freedom Actives Corp.
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Title: Sustainable Ingredients and Innovation in Cosmetics
naturalx innovationx supply chainx genomicsx extractionx biodiversityx fair tradex business modelsx case studiesx
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Keywords: natural | innovation | supply chain | genomics | extraction | biodiversity | fair trade | business models | case studies

Abstract: Demands for innovation and nature in personal care products have, until now, experienced parallel growth according to consumer perception; i.e., the need for efficacy and the need for purity. Considering these diverse views, this article explores how it is possible to create products that satisfy both via sustainability; bringing natural sourcing to ingredients that are innovative and scientifically proven.

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G Dell'Acqua and G Calloni, Sustainable Ingredients and Innovation in Cosmetics, Cosm & Toil 128(8) 528 (2013)

Market Data

  • Global demand for organic personal care was more than $7.6 billion in 2012, and is expected to reach $13.2 billion by 2018.
  • The global organic market has grown due to increasing consumer concerns regarding personal health and hygiene.
  • Widening distribution channels and new product development have contributed to growth.
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Due to the introduction in recent years of innovative products in the cosmetics and personal care market,1, 2 the awareness and demand for innovation, technology and science is growing among consumers.3 At the same time, products of natural origin that are eco-friendly and certified by a multitude of labels are increasingly entering the market,4,5 becoming more and more popular,6, 7 and forcing brands and ingredient suppliers to source into the natural supply chain. Until now, the demands for innovation and nature have experienced parallel growth for different reasons according to consumer perception; i.e., the need for efficacy and the need for purity.

In the cosmetics and personal care market, the distinction between scientific and natural products is notable. The technological consumer looks at the scientific claims and innovations proposed first; the origin of the ingredients or story behind them is secondary. Regardless of the ingredient source, the technological benefits must be there. This type of consumer shops for perceivable efficacy—i.e., color change, wrinkle reduction, increased detergency, reduced body odor, etc.

The nature-driven consumer looks at the origin of the product and ingredients first, with a strong belief that nature carries a guarantee for safety, purity and gentleness. In this case, the consumer is more concerned about product safety than perceivable benefits. He or she prefers “free-from” claims and seeks information about the origin of the ingredients. Eco-friendly concepts are desired, but also, and more recently, information on the communities involved in that particular product’s ingredient sourcing and their commercial involvement—including concepts linked to sustainability and fair trade. For these consumers, technology and innovation in the finished product would be a secondary benefit and not the first determinant in the purchase decision, although an influence while shopping.

Considering these diverse views, how is it possible to create products that satisfy both, i.e., that bring the natural sourcing and sustainability linked to the ingredients, but also are innovative and scientifically proven? This article explores these concepts and a means to marry them: sustainability.

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Table 1. Possible work flow for developing an active ingredient from sustainable sources

Table 1. Possible work flow for developing an active ingredient from sustainable sources

Such tasks require a rigorous approach; a possible work flow for which is shown in Table 1.

Table 2. Gene activation treatment with 0.002% and 0.02% plant extracts

Table 2. Gene activation treatment with 0.002% and 0.02% plant extracts

Table 2 shows the results of gene modifications with greater than two-fold increase or decrease, as such levels of modification would be necessary to induce biological changes.

Footnotes (CT1308 Dell'Acqua)

a Genemarkers collaborated on the described work, www.genemarkersllc.com.
b
Epiderm FT 3D full-thickness skin equivalents by MatTek were used, www.mattek.com.
c
The TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) is a product of Invitrogen, www.invitrogen.com.
d
StatMiner software v4.2 is a product of Integromics Inc., www.integromics.com.


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