Consumer Perception of Fine Lines and Wrinkles: Qualitative Assessment

Jan 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Rosanna Mootoo, Stephanie Basile, Cristina Stroever and Christian Oresajo, L’Oréal USA
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Title: Consumer Perception of Fine Lines and Wrinkles: Qualitative Assessment
fine linesx wrinklesx aging descriptorsx product formsx crow's feetx consumersx surveyx
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Keywords: fine lines | wrinkles | aging descriptors | product forms | crow's feet | consumers | survey

Abstract: There are varying definitions, associations and overall impressions of fine lines and wrinkles among different consumer segments. The findings of this study offer invaluable insight into consumers’ opinions, and by qualitative in-depth interviews, they provide a well-defined vernacular for aging descriptors. This language is critical for developmental research, consumer evaluation and marketing within the cosmetic industry.

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R Mootoo, S Basile, C Stroever and C Oresajo, Consumer perception of fine lines and wrinkles assessed by qualitative methods, Cosm & Toil 128(1) 42-46 (Jan 2013)

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The ways in which consumers individually identify their skin are invaluable to product development. In particular, consumer perception toward aging descriptors is of paramount importance to the category of anti-aging skin care. Within this segment, there appears to be a trend for pairing specific aging descriptors with consumers of a certain age, especially where marketing is concerned. The older consumer is associated with formulas to address deep wrinkles, whereas the younger consumer is associated with minimizing fine lines and more general types of skin maintenance.1-4

Marketing campaigns for various anti-aging portfolios share a common vocabulary. Wrinkles are correlated to either “loss in skin elasticity,” “dryness” and/or “lack of firmness,” to name a few. Moreover, formulas geared toward wrinkles often are described as “rich creams” versus lotions, gels or other product forms. In contrast, formulas addressing fine lines are more ambiguous in nature, and not necessarily branded specifically to address fine lines. Instead, advertising cues such as “renews lackluster skin,” “lightweight formula” and/or “nourishes skin” describe them. They also typically are presented as moisturizers or lotions rather than creams, which suggests a lightweight, less viscous composition.

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This content is adapted from an article in GCI Magazine. The original version can be found here.

 

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Table 1. Responses for fine lines

Table 1. Responses for fine lines

Interview responses for fine lines, segmented by age group

Table 2. Responses for wrinkles

Table 2. Responses for wrinkles

Interview responses for wrinkles, segmented by age group

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