Mitochondrial Nourishment and Protection for Antiaging Effects

Jun 1, 2009 | Contact Author | By: KG Sabarinathan, PhD, CoValence Inc.
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Title: Mitochondrial Nourishment and Protection for Antiaging Effects
mitochondriax antioxidantx nutritionx antiagingx DNAx
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Keywords: mitochondria | antioxidant | nutrition | antiaging | DNA

Abstract: Multiple factors affect the integrity of cell mitochondria, leading to loss of cell function, aging and apoptosis. In skin, this is expressed in the form of wrinkles, loss of tone, etc. To combat these effects, the author describes a technology that contains mitochondria-nourishing compounds to deliver antiaging benefits.

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Virtually everything that human cells need to maintain health requires energy. Each cell contains hundreds to thousands of mitochondria, and each mitochondrion contains multiple copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondrial proteins take food molecules and combine them with oxygen to create chemical energy. This chemical energy produced by the mitochondria through the cellular respiration process is called adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (see Figure 1).

Generally the duration of life varies inversely with the rate of energy expenditure during life. Bio-gerontologist Denham Harman, PhD, the “father of the free radical theory of aging,” once suggested that mitochondria are the crucial component of cells whose rate of decline dictates the overall rate of aging.In addition to supplying cellular energy, mitochondria are involved in a range of other processes such as signaling, cellular differentiation and cell death, as well as controlling the cell’s cycle and growth.2

In human cells and eukaryotic cells in general, DNA is found in two cellular locations: inside the nucleus and inside the mitochondria. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals as by-products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (see Figure 2) damages mitochondrial macromolecules including the mtDNA, leading to deleterious mutations.

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Figure 1. The chemical energy produced by the mitochondria

 Figure 1. The chemical energy produced by the mitochondria

Figure 2. By-products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

 Figure 2. By-products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

Figure 3. The radical absorbance capacity of HORAC

 Figure 3. The radical absorbance capacity of HORAC

Figure 4. The GSH activity showed an increase

 Figure 4. The GSH activity showed an increase

Chirality in Chemistry

 Chirality in Chemistry

HAT Assays

 HAT Assays

Sabarinathan Mitochondrial footnotes

 a Mitoprotect (INCI: Phenyl-butyl-nitrone (PBN) (and) Ubiquinone (and) 1,2-Dithiolane-3-Pentanoic Acid (and) Adenine (and) Acetyl Carnitine (and) antioxidants) is a product and registered trademark of CoValence. 

b The ORAC assay is a patented technology from Brunswick Laboratories.

c 6-Hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox, Hoffman-LaRoche) is a water-soluble derivative of vitamin E.

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