In vitro Buffering Capacity of Human Skin Layers*

Jun 1, 2012 | Contact Author | By: Y. Zheng, MD, PhD, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, and H.I. Maibach, MD, University of California at San Francisco
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Title: In vitro Buffering Capacity of Human Skin Layers*
bufferingx stratum corneumx irritantsx in vitrox
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Keywords: buffering | stratum corneum | irritants | in vitro

Abstract: Previous studies demonstrate that skin buffering capacity can be measured in vitro by applying several concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) on skin and evaluating the pH change pre- and post-dosing. Here, the authors employed this technique to evaluate the buffering capacity of skin layers including intact SC, denuded SC and dermis skin samples.

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Y Zheng and HI Maibach, A dermatological view—In vitro buffering capacity of human skin layers, Cosm & Toil 127(6) 426-429 (Jun 2012)

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Normal stratum corneum (SC) is acidic, with typical pH ranges from 4 to 6, and while skin exposed to aqueous acid or alkaline solutions exhibits changes in pH, it may rapidly restore to the baseline values. This phenomena is called buffering capacity. Many factors contribute to skin’s buffering capacity including keratin, proteins, sweat, SC thickness, free amino acids and other water-soluble epidermis constituents.

Previous studies demonstrate that skin buffering capacity can be measured in vitro by applying several concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) on skin and evaluating the pH change pre- and post-dosing. Here, the authors employed this technique to evaluate the buffering capacity of skin layers including intact SC, denuded SC and dermis skin samples.

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This is an excerpt of an article from GCI Magazine. The full version can be found here.

 

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Figure 1. Skin pH changes following NaOH exposure

Figure 1. Skin pH changes following NaOH exposure

Skin pH changes following NaOH exposure; note that the final measured pH did not reach baseline values, pH = 6.0; *P < 0.05, SC denuded model compared with intact SC; ▲ P < 0.05, dermis model compared with intact SC

Figure 2. Skin pH changes following HCl exposure

Figure 2. Skin pH changes following HCl exposure

Skin pH changes following HCl exposure; note that final measured pH values reached the baseline readings 30 min post-wash; *P < 0.05, SC denuded model compared with intact SC; ▲ P < 0.05, dermis model compared with intact SC.

Figure 3. Calculated buffering capacities

Figure 3. Calculated buffering capacities

Buffering capacities calculated based on Eq. 1, a) for NaOH and b) for HCl

Footnotes [Zheng 127(6)]

a The PM900 pH Meter and the TM 210 Tewameter used for this study are manufactured by Courage and Khazaka, Kolne, West Germany; and bAcaderm, Menlo Park, CA, USA.

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