Corneocare and Comfort Science

Oct 1, 2013 | Contact Author | By: Katerina Steventon, PhD, FaceWorkshops
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Title: Corneocare and Comfort Science
corneocarex corneotherapyx corneobiologyx stratum corneumx dry skinx moisturizerx
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Keywords: corneocare | corneotherapy | corneobiology | stratum corneum | dry skin | moisturizer

Abstract: At the Skin Forum 2013 event in London, the seven pillars of “corneocare,” were introduced, which targeted: the epidermal tissue at the molecular, cellular and structural level; epidermal function; tactile experience; appearance and sensation. This is one of the first concepts in personal care to close the gap between consumer perception and a scientific approach.

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K Steventon, Corneocare and Comfort Science, Cosm & Toil 128(10) 712 (2013)

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Recent market research demonstrates that consumers often consider moisturizing benefits more important than anti-aging benefits. Rawlings and Voegeli have suggested that the tight sensation of dry skin might, in fact, be of greater concern than visible wrinkles; therefore, sensation might be more important than appearance. Surveys in Japan, the United States and France have also shown that as much as 40% of the female population perceives itself to have an issue with dry skin, and current moisturizing technologies do not meet the needs of these consumers.

Delayed desquamation and the accumulation of corneocytes on the surface of the stratum corneum (SC) leads to dry skin. Rawlings and Voegeli therefore postulate that the future of moisturizers lies in controlling desquamation.2 In relation, at the Skin Forum 2013 event in London, these authors introduced the seven pillars of “corneocare,” targeting: the epidermal tissue at the molecular, cellular and structural level; epidermal function; tactile experience; appearance and sensation. This is one of the first concepts in personal care to close the gap between consumer perception and a scientific approach.

The concept of corneocare also was highlighted by DSM at the 2013 in-cosmetics Paris, where the company focused on “comfort science”—a holistic approach to epidermal skin sensation, connecting a youthful appearance to a healthy, functioning epidermis. This brings a different dimension to the SC by recognizing it as an interface for imparting visual and tactile sensory signal processing. Rawlings presented on this subject as well, speaking as the Society of Cosmetic Scientists’ Medal Lecturer on Mar. 7, 2013, in London. Here, he focused on enhancing epidermal sensation by building a strong barrier function.

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Stratum Corneum Functions

  • Antimicrobial
  • Antioxidant
  • Biosensor of meteorological conditions
  • Chemical, to exclude antigens
  • Cohesion/desquamation Hydration Inflammation initiator
  • Mechanical/rheological
  • Permeability
  • Protection against carcinogenesis and photo-aging
  • Protection against electromagnetic radiation
  • Psycho-sensory
  • Regulator of innate and adaptive immunity
  • Social communication
  • Storage site of chemical mediators and topical agents

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